6 simple things you can do to stay safe around fireworks this Fourth of July.

We all know fireworks can be a lot of fun, but they can also be really dangerous (like really, really dangerous).

In 2016, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (USCPSC), four people died as the result of fireworks-related injuries in the U.S., and around 11,100 people were injured.

Luckily, the USCPSC has a number of helpful resources on their website for avoiding injury, as well videos demonstrating how to safely use fireworks. They even have a PSA from New York Giants defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul, a star football player who lost his right index finger to a fireworks accident in 2015.


Here are six easy steps you can take to greatly reduce your chance of injury, while still being able to have fireworks fun this summer.

1. Never let children light fireworks and have them keep a safe distance from any explosives.

Children under the age of 15 made up 31% of all fireworks-related injuries in 2016. Even sparklers can be dangerous, burning at around 2,000 degrees!

All GIFs from USCPSC/YouTube.

2. Never try to re-light fireworks that didn't go off.

Sometimes a dud isn't actually a dud. Even if it was just a case of the fuse fizzling out before it reached the end, there's a reason it's as long as it is to begin with: to give you enough time to get a safe distance away. Lighting a short fuse is a bad idea. Douse the firework with water and move on.

3. Don't point fireworks at other people, and make sure there's nothing in their flight path before igniting the fuse.

Roman candles, bottle rockets, and other smaller explosives are no exception. These can all cause some pretty significant injuries.

4. Keep a hose and a bucket of water nearby, and be sure to douse all spent fireworks in water after they're done burning.

After your fireworks are spent, hit them with a quick blast of water to neutralize any residual explosive powder. And since you're working with fire anyway, the hose and bucket are good to have on hand in case something goes wrong.

5. Don't set off fireworks in metal or glass containers.

If flying shards of glass and metal shrapnel aren't welcome editions to your Fourth of July festivities, it's probably best not to use empty bottles or metal containers as makeshift launchpads.

6. Most importantly, leave the professional fireworks to the professionals.

Following the guidelines in the five tips above will ensure safety for you and your family while lighting bottle rockets, sparklers, Roman candles, smoke bombs, and firecrackers. When it comes to the bigger shows and sky-high fireworks, however, the absolute best thing you can do is to leave it up to the pros.

Pack some snacks, a blanket or a few lawn chairs, and check out your local news or government website to find out where the nearest fireworks display is happening.

Because, to paraphrase "The Simpsons," what better way to celebrate the independence of your nation than to blow up a small part of it?

Check out this 2017 video from the USCPSC for more useful tips about fireworks safety. (Additional videos from 2015 and 2016 can be found on the organization's YouTube page.)

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
True

Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

Keep Reading Show less

Even as millions of Americans celebrated the inauguration of President Joe Biden this week, the nation also mourned the fact that, for the first time in modern history, the United States did not have a peaceful transition of power.

With the violent attack on the U.S. Capitol on January 6, when pro-Trump insurrectionists attempted to stop the constitutional process of counting electoral votes and where terrorists threatened to kill lawmakers and the vice president for not keeping Trump in power, our long and proud tradition was broken. And although presidential power was ultimately transferred without incident on January 20, the presence of 20,000 National Guard troops around the Capitol reminded us of the threat that still lingers.

First Lady Jill Biden showed up today with cookies in hand for a group of National Guard troops at the Capitol to thank them for keeping her family safe. The homemade chocolate chip cookies were a small token of appreciation, but one that came from the heart of a mother whose son had served as well.

Keep Reading Show less
True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.