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10 Terrifying Facts About Guns In The U.S.

With gun control suddenly at the forefront of the American political conversation, interest groups on both sides of the debate have started to make their own claims about the state of guns and gun violence in America. So, what do the numbers really look like? Check below the graphic for our sources.

10 Terrifying Facts About Guns In The U.S.





Sources

Kenneth D. Kochanek, Jiaquan Xu, Sherry L. Murphy, Arialdi M. Minino, and Hsiang-Ching Kung. "Deaths: Final Data for 2009." National Vital Statistics Reports. Dec. 19, 2011. 

Christpher S. Koper. "Crime Gun Risk Factors: Buyer, Seller, Firearm, and Transaction Characteristics Associated with Gun Trafficking and Criminal Gun Use." Jerry Lee Center of Criminology, University of Pennsylvania. 2007. 

"Point, Click, Fire: An Investigation Of Illegal Online Gun Sales." City of New York. December 2011.

Caroline Wolf Harlow. "Firearm Use by Offenders." U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. November 2001.

Sam Stein. "Gun Owners Surveyed By Frank Luntz Express Broad Support For Gun Control Policies." The Huffington Post. Jul. 24, 2012. 

U.S. Code, Title 18, Section 924(c) 

U.S. Code, Title 18, Section 2316

Ezra Klein. "Twelve Facts About Guns and Mass Shootings in the United States."  The Washington Post. Dec. 14, 2012. 

Erin G. Richardson and David Hemenway. "Homicide, Suicide, and Unintentional Firearm Fatality: Comparing the United States With Other High Income Countries, 2003."  The Journal of Trauma, Injury, Infection and Critical Care. January 2011. 
















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