10 practical and meaningful ways you can take part in this historic moment
Photo by Aarón Blanco Tejedor on Unsplash
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So we can all agree that 2020 is panning out to be pretty rough, right? We're dealing with a global pandemic, economic crash, 400 years of racial inequality , and murder hornets.

Trash Reaction GIF by Robert E Blackmon Giphy

If you're sitting at home, shouting expletives and/or wringing your hands wishing there was something you could do, guess what? Every single human being can find a small way to help, and we are here to inspire you to make a difference.

Got your notepad ready? Here we go.


You feel paralyzed every time you log on to social media or turn on the news.

Solution: We get it. It's a lot. We invite you to stop arguing with your distant relatives on Facebook and turn your attention to the outside world. Wave hello to a neighbor. Smile at a child. Scream into a pillow.

Help a senior citizen by running an errand, loading groceries into their vehicle, or carrying bags to the front door. Do something small to make someone else's day better, before returning to your own.

You want to donate money to a good cause but find the choices overwhelming.

Solution: There are so many worthy causes out there right now. The problem of having too many choices is actually not a bad one to have; it means a lot of kindred spirits are out there doing wonderful things, and all you have to do is click a few buttons to send support.

You can do this. Really.

You want to help people in need, but you have $10 or less to spend.

Solution: On your next grocery trip , hit the BOGO sales. Buy an extra box of cereal or can of black beans and give the surplus to a local food bank. Every item makes a difference, and if you take advantage of a drugstore sale, pick up feminine hygiene products, deodorant, or shampoo and donate them to a homeless shelter.

You want to be an activist but have no idea where to start.

Solution: Half of the battle is won already, friend. Use the internet to find a local group of like-minded people. Enter a search on your city and include the type of activism you are interested in. Look up the word "activism" to make sure you understand what it is. See when and where virtual activist training is available. Be open. Follow the minority leadership, be peaceful, and listen.

Photo by Mike Von on Unsplash

The idea of activism makes you want to hide in a closet.

Solution: Great! How are you at writing letters? Baking? Childcare? Errand-running? Figure out what you have to offer, and then volunteer your services to the activists in your community. Many of them want to do more but can't because they're too busy doing a task that you might find enjoyable.

Children have questions. About everything.

Solution: Yes, we know. There really is a lot to take in, and you haven't had time to fully process it, and you'd rather just not have those conversations. But if you muster up the courage to face it head on, the kids will be empowered with the knowledge they need to navigate tricky situations with their peers. Talking to children openly and honestly helps them become future allies and advocates for justice, period.

You suspect you might be part of the problem, or know someone who might be part of the problem.

Solution: The first step in making a difference is acknowledging that there is a problem. Find some quiet time to ponder this. Think about what you can do to improve the situation within your small sphere of influence.

Important people in your life don't agree with your views.

Solution: Your job isn't to change them. Your task is to love them enough to have an honest conversation. Listen to why they might feel strongly about an issue. Ask questions without judgement so that you can better understand where they might be coming from. It's possible to create space for them (and their quirks) without condoning bad or unethical behavior. Humanity is complicated—just love them, and burn a lot of sage.

You've got very little free time, money is tight, and your emotional bandwidth is tapped.

Solution: Text a friend, just to check on them. Admire the birds from your window. Sign up to give back every time you buy essentials like laundry detergent and toothpaste, so that you're able to do good without having to think about it.

You are very often in a bad mood.

Solution: Tap into the positive energy of Mother Earth. Garden, plant trees to fight climate change, shake your fist at the sky, sit in the sun and stick your feet in a patch of grass. Everything is connected to everything else—creating positive energy will help everyone, most of all, you.

If all of us aim to improve the common welfare, think of the possibilities for our future! Don't let excuses or lack of experience keep you from making a difference.

Turn your everyday actions into acts of good every day at P&G Good Everyday.

via USO

Army Capt. Justin Meredith used the Bob Hope Legacy Reading Program to read to his son and family while deployed in the Middle East.

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One of the biggest challenges deployed service members face is the feeling of being separated from their families, especially when they have children. It's also very stressful for children to be away from parents who are deployed for long periods of time.

For the past four years, the USO has brought deployed service members and their families closer through a wonderful program that allows them to read together. The Bob Hope Legacy Reading Program gives deployed service members the ability to choose a book, read it on camera, then send both the recording and book to their child.

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