You should hear this hilarious Taylor Swift cover. Why? Because science *also* has 'Style.'

I <3 science.

&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;span class="redactor-invisible-space"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/span&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

Nerds are the best.

I wouldn't be typing on this sweet laptop without them. I wouldn't be able to see the screen either because no one would have invented the monitor. Or my glasses. Or the Internet. Therefore...



Science has style. And it's always had it.

Knowledge enables people to do it all, and science is a big part of that.

Some think being smart is the opposite of cool, but in reality it is the coolest thing you can be.

Scientifically stylish duo ASAP Science even made a song about it ... they list a bunch of cool science facts to prove that science has style.

I'd like to assist them by elaborating on those facts to show you just how cool they actually are.

Here are five science tidbits hidden in ASAP Science's "Style":

1. "Sunlight takes 8 minutes just to reach your eyes."

How do we know that? The idea that light even has a speed had never crossed most minds before Danish smart person Ole Rømer decided to prove it. The astronomer (and former tutor of Louis XIV's children) discovered the speed of light is always the same by measuring the eclipses of one of Jupiter's moons, Io.

Jupiter's moon, Io.

But it was only after astronomers dutifully took measurements for two centurieswowza, that's dedication — that astronomer Jean Baptiste Joseph Delambre calculated the speed of light to reach the planet was 8 minutes and 12 seconds.

These days, we've landed at a more accurate at 8 minutes and 19 seconds, which means light travels at about 670,616,629 mph.

2. "You love those iPhone apps that help you flirt."

Flirtation: That spark may ignite the flames of love.

Did you know the way we act in relationships as adults can be traced to our very first relationship out of the womb?

Science explains how the touch and care you receive as an impressionable child affects how you react to affection in general, especially when finding a mate.

Psychologist Harry F. Harlow is remembered for the monkey-love experiments he did on mother and child rhesus monkeys.

In the 1930s, Harlow deduced that the warmth and closeness of an emotional touch is necessary for one to develop empathy and affection toward others.

How'd he prove that? By conducting mother-switching experiments with primates. When they gave monkeys less real-mom time and more fake-mom time — fake-mom was made of wire mesh, which sounds terrifying — they were more aggressive, insular, and unkind when they grew up. And they weren't nearly as affectionate or close with others, as monkeys usually are.

This GIF? Science in motion.

This is how we know that if you're a cuddle monster, then a parent figure of yours probably was too. And that affection with another living thing is one of the keys to a smoother life.

3. "Evolution made your brain, heart, spinal cord, and also your eyes."

Eyes started out as photoreceptor cells in microscopic worms.

This microscopic worm, a planarian, has two light-sensing dots on its head.

If you're wondering how you got eyes, well, the answer is that basically we used to be worms.

Here's some more mind-boggling information for you: Your eyes have evolved 50-100 times from when they were dots in a worm like the one above.

The Pikaia gracilens was a primitive worm that had a notochord (a primitive backbone), a nervous system (like we do), and muscles. Because of its backbone, scientists can tell that we evolved from it.

This news might be alarming to your ick-factor, but 500 million years later ... just look at us! We didn't turn out half bad.

4. "Medicine made vaccines, technologies that keep you alive."

Did you know the chemical that treats malaria just happened to be discovered by someone who was dying of malaria at the time?

As the story goes, a South American Indian, while wandering disoriented in the middle of nowhere with the mosquito-borne illness, just happened to drink from pool of water that he collapsed in and it just happened to have cinchona growing in it.

Cinchona plants just happen to have quinine in them, which cured him — and, now that we know, countless others. All the things that strive to keep us from coughing, fainting, and dying are thanks to science, even when they happen through luck.

5. "Every time that you eat, read, text, or take a selfie and smile."

The greatness of science these two guys are crooning about is true — just think about how much science we live:

  • When you eat? Chemistry, nutrition, and agriculture are all happening before, after, and during food's time on your plate.
  • When you read ... neurology, psychology, and optometry are teammates, keeping you glued the page.
  • When you sing a Taylor Swift parody like this one: Neurology can explain how your brain remembers the words while it sends signals to your lungs. Physics carries that sound to us, and then, communication is complete.

Simply put: Science is a part of *everything* that ever was, is, and will be.

That's pretty darn cool, if you ask me.

Heroes


Climate change is happening because the earth is warming at an accelerated rate, a significant portion of that acceleration is due to human activity, and not taking measures to mitigate it will have disastrous consequences for life as we know it.

In other words: Earth is heating up, it's kinda our fault, and if we don't fix it, we're screwed.

This is the consensus of the vast majority of the world's scientists who study such things for a living. Case closed. End of story.

How do we know this to be true? Because pretty much every reputable scientific organization on the planet has examined and endorsed these conclusions. Thousands of climate studies have been done, and multiple peer-reviewed studies have been done on those studies, showing that somewhere between 84 and 97 percent of active climate science experts support these conclusions. In fact, the majority of those studies put the consensus well above 90%.

Keep Reading Show less
Nature

As a child, Dr. Sangeeta Bhatia's parents didn't ask her what she wanted to be when she grew up. Instead, her father would ask, "Are you going to be a doctor? Are you going to be an engineer? Or are you going to be an entrepreneur?"

Little did he know that she would successfully become all three: an award-winning biomedical and mechanical engineer who performs cutting-edge medical research and has started multiple companies.

Bhatia holds an M.D. from Harvard University, an M.S. in mechanical engineering from MIT, and a PhD in biomedical engineering from MIT. Bhatia, a Wilson professor of engineering at MIT, is currently serving as director of the Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine, where she's working on nanotechnology targeting enzymes in cancer cells. This would allow cancer screenings to be done with a simple urine test.

Bhatia owes much of her impressive career to her family. Her parents were refugees who met in graduate school in India; in fact, she says her mom was the first woman to earn an MBA in the country. The couple immigrated to the U.S. in the 1960s, started a family, and worked hard to give their two daughters the best opportunities.

"They made enormous sacrifices to pick a town with great public schools and really push us to excel the whole way," Bhatia says. "They really believed in us, but they expected excellence. The story I like to tell about my dad is like, if you brought home a 96 on a math test, the response would be, 'What'd you get wrong?'"

Keep Reading Show less
Packard Foundation
True

I live in a family with various food intolerances. Thankfully, none of them are super serious, but we are familiar with the challenges of finding alternatives to certain foods, constantly checking labels, and asking restaurants about their ingredients.

In our family, if someone accidentally eats something they shouldn't, it's mainly a bit of inconvenient discomfort. For those with truly life-threatening food allergies, the stakes are much higher.

I can't imagine the ongoing stress of deadly allergy, especially for parents trying to keep their little ones safe.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Amy Johnson

The first day of school can be both exciting and scary at the same time — especially if it's your first day ever, as was the case for a nervous four-year-old in Wisconsin. But with a little help from a kind bus driver, he was able to get over his fear.

Axel was "super excited" waiting for the bus in Augusta with his mom, Amy Johnson, until it came time to actually get on.

"He was all smiles when he saw me around the corner and I started to slow down and that's when you could see his face start to change," his bus driver, Isabel "Izzy" Lane, told WEAU.

The scared boy wouldn't get on the bus without help from his mom, so she picked him up and carried him aboard, trying to give him a pep talk.

"He started to cling to me and I told him, 'Buddy, you got this and will have so much fun!'" Johnson told Fox 7.

Keep Reading Show less
Most Shared