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Nerds are the best.

I wouldn't be typing on this sweet laptop without them. I wouldn't be able to see the screen either because no one would have invented the monitor. Or my glasses. Or the Internet. Therefore...



Science has style. And it's always had it.

Knowledge enables people to do it all, and science is a big part of that.

Some think being smart is the opposite of cool, but in reality it is the coolest thing you can be.

Scientifically stylish duo ASAP Science even made a song about it ... they list a bunch of cool science facts to prove that science has style.

I'd like to assist them by elaborating on those facts to show you just how cool they actually are.

Here are five science tidbits hidden in ASAP Science's "Style":

1. "Sunlight takes 8 minutes just to reach your eyes."

How do we know that? The idea that light even has a speed had never crossed most minds before Danish smart person Ole Rømer decided to prove it. The astronomer (and former tutor of Louis XIV's children) discovered the speed of light is always the same by measuring the eclipses of one of Jupiter's moons, Io.

Jupiter's moon, Io.

But it was only after astronomers dutifully took measurements for two centurieswowza, that's dedication — that astronomer Jean Baptiste Joseph Delambre calculated the speed of light to reach the planet was 8 minutes and 12 seconds.

These days, we've landed at a more accurate at 8 minutes and 19 seconds, which means light travels at about 670,616,629 mph.

2. "You love those iPhone apps that help you flirt."

Flirtation: That spark may ignite the flames of love.

Did you know the way we act in relationships as adults can be traced to our very first relationship out of the womb?

Science explains how the touch and care you receive as an impressionable child affects how you react to affection in general, especially when finding a mate.

Psychologist Harry F. Harlow is remembered for the monkey-love experiments he did on mother and child rhesus monkeys.

In the 1930s, Harlow deduced that the warmth and closeness of an emotional touch is necessary for one to develop empathy and affection toward others.

How'd he prove that? By conducting mother-switching experiments with primates. When they gave monkeys less real-mom time and more fake-mom time — fake-mom was made of wire mesh, which sounds terrifying — they were more aggressive, insular, and unkind when they grew up. And they weren't nearly as affectionate or close with others, as monkeys usually are.

This GIF? Science in motion.

This is how we know that if you're a cuddle monster, then a parent figure of yours probably was too. And that affection with another living thing is one of the keys to a smoother life.

3. "Evolution made your brain, heart, spinal cord, and also your eyes."

Eyes started out as photoreceptor cells in microscopic worms.

This microscopic worm, a planarian, has two light-sensing dots on its head.

If you're wondering how you got eyes, well, the answer is that basically we used to be worms.

Here's some more mind-boggling information for you: Your eyes have evolved 50-100 times from when they were dots in a worm like the one above.

The Pikaia gracilens was a primitive worm that had a notochord (a primitive backbone), a nervous system (like we do), and muscles. Because of its backbone, scientists can tell that we evolved from it.

This news might be alarming to your ick-factor, but 500 million years later ... just look at us! We didn't turn out half bad.

4. "Medicine made vaccines, technologies that keep you alive."

Did you know the chemical that treats malaria just happened to be discovered by someone who was dying of malaria at the time?

As the story goes, a South American Indian, while wandering disoriented in the middle of nowhere with the mosquito-borne illness, just happened to drink from pool of water that he collapsed in and it just happened to have cinchona growing in it.

Cinchona plants just happen to have quinine in them, which cured him — and, now that we know, countless others. All the things that strive to keep us from coughing, fainting, and dying are thanks to science, even when they happen through luck.

5. "Every time that you eat, read, text, or take a selfie and smile."

The greatness of science these two guys are crooning about is true — just think about how much science we live:

  • When you eat? Chemistry, nutrition, and agriculture are all happening before, after, and during food's time on your plate.
  • When you read ... neurology, psychology, and optometry are teammates, keeping you glued the page.
  • When you sing a Taylor Swift parody like this one: Neurology can explain how your brain remembers the words while it sends signals to your lungs. Physics carries that sound to us, and then, communication is complete.

Simply put: Science is a part of *everything* that ever was, is, and will be.

That's pretty darn cool, if you ask me.

Moricz was banned from speaking up about LGBTQ topics. He found a brilliant workaround.

Senior class president Zander Moricz was given a fair warning: If he used his graduation speech to criticize the “Don’t Say Gay” law, then his microphone would be shut off immediately.

Moricz had been receiving a lot of attention for his LGBTQ activism prior to the ceremony. Moricz, an openly gay student at Pine View School for the Gifted in Florida, also organized student walkouts in protest and is the youngest public plaintiff in the state suing over the law formally known as the Parental Rights in Education law, which prohibits the discussion of sexual orientation or gender identity in grades K-3.

Though well beyond third grade, Moricz nevertheless was also banned from speaking up about the law, gender or sexuality. The 18-year-old tweeted, “I am the first openly-gay Class President in my school’s history–this censorship seems to show that they want me to be the last.”

However, during his speech, Moricz still delivered a powerful message about identity. Even if he did have to use a clever metaphor to do it.

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Matthew McConaughey in 2019.

Oscar-winning actor Matthew McConaughey made a heartfelt plea for Americans to “do better” on Tuesday after a gunman murdered 19 children and 2 adults at Robb Elementary School in his hometown of Uvalde, Texas.

Uvalde is a small town of about 16,000 residents approximately 85 miles west of San Antonio. The actor grew up in Uvalde until he was 11 years old when his family moved to Longview, 430 miles away.

The suspected murderer, 18-year-old Salvador Ramos, was killed by law enforcement at the scene of the crime. Before the rampage, Ramos allegedly shot his grandmother after a disagreement.

“As you all are aware there was another mass shooting today, this time in my home town of Uvalde, Texas,” McConaughey wrote in a statement shared on Twitter. “Once again, we have tragically proven that we are failing to be responsible for the rights our freedoms grant us.”

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Joy

Meet Eva, the hero dog who risked her life saving her owner from a mountain lion

Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva when a mountain lion suddenly appeared.

Photo by Didssph on Unsplash

A sweet face and fierce loyalty: Belgian Malinois defends owner.

The Belgian Malinois is a special breed of dog. It's highly intelligent, extremely athletic and needs a ton of interaction. While these attributes make the Belgian Malinois the perfect dog for police and military work, they can be a bit of a handful as a typical pet.

As Belgian Malinois owner Erin Wilson jokingly told NPR, they’re basically "a German shepherd on steroids or crack or cocaine.”

It was her Malinois Eva’s natural drive, however, that ended up saving Wilson’s life.

According to a news release from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva slightly ahead of her when a mountain lion suddenly appeared and swiped Wilson across the left shoulder. She quickly yelled Eva’s name and the dog’s instincts kicked in immediately. Eva rushed in to defend her owner.

It wasn’t long, though, before the mountain lion won the upper hand, much to Wilson’s horror.

She told TODAY, “They fought for a couple seconds, and then I heard her start crying. That’s when the cat latched on to her skull.”

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