When a flood left people stranded, this man had the perfect rescue vehicle.

Usually, monster trucks do this...

Photo by Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images for MetLife.


And when they're not doing ... whatever that is ... they're presumably sleeping. In monster garages. Or getting their monster oil checked by monster mechanics.

Celebrity monster trucks like "Grave Digger," "Spiderman," and "Higher Education," (which is a monster school bus) can be seen at events like Monster Jam, which is attended by millions of people every year. They jump around, flip over, roll on top of cars, and engage in other high-octane stunts for the cheering masses, all based on their ability to crunch windows, mash steel, and otherwise DESTROYYYYY (cue Mötorhead or something).

The point is, monster trucks are not usually saving people's lives. That is, until two days ago.

Southeast Texas has been dealing with historic and deadly flooding this week. So far, at least seven people have died and over 1,000 homes have been destroyed by water damage.

Photo by STR/AFP/Getty Images.

According to USA Today, all of the tragic deaths occurred after people drove their cars into flooded roads.

Which puts the people of Texas in an incredibly tough position. In many cases, their homes are surrounded by water, but they can't safely flee without risking their lives.

Luckily, Cole Geeo from Parker County, Texas, had an unexpectedly perfect rescue vehicle.

One of these bad boys:

Photo by Luke Frazza/AFP/Getty Images.

Well, sort of. His looks more like this:

F*** yeah. Photo via Nomdesoul/YouTube.

That's right, Geeo broke out his monster truck (or rather, his pick-up truck with raised tires and springs) and drove it straight through the flood...


All GIFs via Adella James/YouTube.

...to rescue Debora Wright, a neighbor who had been stranded on the roof of her home in Millsap.


"That's a redneck rescue I do believe," said Dina Gray, a co-worker of Wright's, who called for help when she found out her friend was stranded.

"It’s just been an adventurous day," Wright said when she finally reached dry land.

As any classic adventure story concludes, the day was saved and our hero Geeo and his monster truck rode off into the sunset.

It's pretty awesome that a monster truck ended up being the perfect tool in this situation.

But not as amazing as the fact that Cole Geeo was ready, willing, and able to help his neighbor when she needed it.

"That’s just how [people in Millsap are]," said Gray. "We just look out for one another ... If this didn’t work, we were going to get a boat."

Watch the video of the whole rescue below:

via Pexels

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