This Chinese model is getting publicly shamed for her freckles in a new untouched Zara ad.

It’s becoming more normal for fashion brands to come under fire for retouching their models, but Zara has received backlash for not retouching a women's face in their recent campaign.

A recent makeup ad for Zara features a fresh-faced and freckled Li Jing Wen, who is known professionally as Jing Wen. Now, Zara has been accused of “uglifying China” by presenting the model’s natural freckles.

Image via Zara


Social media site Weibo saw insults spread with the hashtag “Insult to China.”

“After seeing this ad I have decided I will not buy any products from Zara, not because I think the model is ugly, but because you are discriminating Asians' view of beauty,” wrote Weibo user Moshiwuchang.

It’s rare for Chinese people to have freckles. Instead of finding that Li’s looks are unique, some people took her appearance as an affront.

User EvelynYoung_23 wrote, "I'm sorry, we Asian women don't have freckles. Even if we do, it's a small number of people ... You must have tried very hard to find such a model."

But such comments were in the minority.

Photo by  BERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images

Most users came to Li’s defense, describing her freckles as rare and beautiful.

One user posted, “I feel it’s not the brand discriminating against Asian women, but people discriminating against people with freckles.” Weibo user TheChineseModels posted, “"Every person has different understanding of beauty and we don't have to have the same view of aesthetics, but we need to be open with different faces."

Some users applauded Zara’s lack of retouching. "Li Jingwen is thousands of times more beautiful than those faces that have been retouched," wrote user saxaK. User Amy_xuhu added, "Please don't live in the filters, isn't it good to be real?"

Zara addressed the controversy, standing by their decision to show Li as she is. "The aesthetics of the Spanish people are different," Zara said in a statement. "Our models are all photographed purely, the pictures aren't changed, and they're not modified. "Zara made no attempt to “uglify” their model. "She has always looked like this, her face has not been photoshopped, she was photographed naturally,” said Zara.

Li has modeled for brands such as Prada, Calvin Klein, Chanel, H&M, and Tommy Hilfiger. She has also graced Vogue’s cover in Italy andChina. Li grew up disliking her freckles. The model told Vogue in 2016, "When I was little, I really hated them because normally Asian people don’t have them,’ said Li. “In high school, I always tried to cover them, but now it's ok. I like them, and that's enough."

Chinese daily GlobalTimes called Li’s freckles “iconic,” and we would have to agree. There is beauty in imperfection. It’s great that Zara chose to present a model as she is, rather than retouching her to fit beauty standards.

True

It takes a special type of person to become a nurse. The job requires a combination of energy, empathy, clear mind, oftentimes a strong stomach, and a cheerful attitude. And while people typically think of nursing in a clinical setting, some nurses are driven to work with the people that feel forgotten by society.

Keep Reading Show less

Prior to baby formula, breastfeeding was the norm, but that doesn't mean it always worked.

As if the past handful of years weren't challenging enough, the U.S. is currently dealing with a baby formula crisis.

Due to a perfect storm of supply chain issues, product recalls, labor shortages and inflation, manufacturers are struggling to keep up with formula demand and retailers are rationing supplies. As a result, families that rely on formula are scrambling to ensure that their babies get the food they need.

Naturally, people are weighing in on the crisis, with some throwing out simplistic advice like, "Why don't you just do what people did before baby formula was invented and just breastfeed?"

That might seem logical, unless you understand how breastfeeding works and know a bit about infant mortality throughout human history.

Keep Reading Show less

Courtesy of Elaine Ahn

True

The energy in a hospital can sometimes feel overwhelming, whether you’re experiencing it as a patient, visitor or employee. However, there are a few one-of-a-kind individuals like Elaine Ahn, an operating room registered nurse in Diamond Bar, California, who thrive under this type of constant pressure.

Keep Reading Show less
via Pexels

Your cat knows you better than you think.

Cats are often seen as being aloof or standoffish, even with their owners. Of course, that differs based on who that cat lives with and their lifetime of experience with humans. But when compared to man’s best friend, cats usually seem less interested in those around them, regardless of species.

However, a new study out of Japan has found that cats may be paying more attention to their fellow felines and human friends than most people thought. In fact, they could be listening to human conversations.

"What we discovered is astonishing," Saho Takagi, a research fellow specializing in animal science at Azabu University in Kanagawa Prefecture, told The Asahi Shimbun. "I want people to know the truth. Felines do not appear to listen to people's conversations, but as a matter of fact, they do."

How do we know they’re listening? Because the study shows that household cats often know the names of their human and feline friends.

Keep Reading Show less

Yuri has a very important message for his co-workers.

While every person with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is different, there are some common communication traits that everyone should understand. Many with ASD process language literally and have a hard time understanding body language, social cues, exaggeration and cultural cues.

This can lead to misunderstandings that result in people with ASD appearing to be rude when it wasn't their intent. If more neurotypical people (those without ASD) better understood these communication differences, it’d be much easier for everyone to get along.

A perfect example of this problem and how to fix it was shared by Yuri, a transmasc person who goes by he/they, who posts on TikTok about having ADHD and ASD. In a post that has more than 2.3 million views, Yuri claims he was “booked for a disciplinary meeting for being a bad communicator.”

Keep Reading Show less