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They Worked On A Poster For 9 Years, So The Internet Gave Them $118,000. No Big Deal.

A few months ago, we posted about a fundraiser for the Beehive Design Collective. What's the Beehive Design Collective, you ask? It's a group of amazing artists that creates story graphics on themes of globalization and resistance. Their work is fantastically detailed and chock-full of both history and passion. The Bees' most recent poster (the subject of their fundraising campaign) is called Mesoamérica Resiste. It tells stories of resistance, resilience, and solidarity from Mexico to Colombia. It shows the modern invasion of megaprojects planned for the region as well as grassroots efforts to defend land and traditions, protect cultural and ecological diversity, and build alternative economies. So whatever happened with that campaign? Well, in large part thanks to Upworthians like you donating and sharing the post, the Bees more than tripled their fundraising and outreach goals, ending up just a few dollars short of a whopping $118,000 from 3,000 backers around the world.But the story's not over! You can learn about the next chapter of the Bees' adventure once the poster went to print and watch the video below.

Here you can check out the Kickstarter crowdfunding video:


And here's the snapshot of their campaign's progress on Kickstarter. The blue line shows how much money was donated to the project throughout the month of fundraising. Check out that spike on Dec. 3!



What are they up to now? Well, they're touring with their new poster, of course! Here are some great images from recent touring:

Above: On the way to Chiapas, Mexico

Above: Chiapas, Mexico

Above: Colombia

Above: Guatemala

Above: Guatemala


And lastly, a lovely message from the Bees:

"Us Bees are endlessly grateful to Upworthy for helping re-package our elaborate, long-form BIG news into a potent story-seed that rapidly spread to audiences internationally ... simultaneously sharing our creative inspiration and igniting mass grassroots support and distribution. Way to put your superpower of viral magic to fantastic use! <3"

Nice job, Bees and Upworthians! Thanks for letting Upworthy be a part of your grand adventure.

Joy

1991 blooper clip of Robin Williams and Elmo is a wholesome nugget of comedic genius

Robin Williams is still bringing smiles to faces after all these years.

Robin Williams and Elmo (Kevin Clash) bloopers.

The late Robin Williams could make picking out socks funny, so pairing him with the fuzzy red monster Elmo was bound to be pure wholesome gold. Honestly, how the puppeteer, Kevin Clash, didn’t completely break character and bust out laughing is a miracle. In this short outtake clip, you get to see Williams crack a few jokes in his signature style while Elmo tries desperately to keep it together.

Williams has been a household name since what seems like the beginning of time, and before his death in 2014, he would make frequent appearances on "Sesame Street." The late actor played so many roles that if you were ask 10 different people what their favorite was, you’d likely get 10 different answers. But for the kids who spent their childhoods watching PBS, they got to see him being silly with his favorite monsters and a giant yellow canary. At least I think Big Bird is a canary.

When he stopped by "Sesame Street" for the special “Big Bird's Birthday or Let Me Eat Cake” in 1991, he was there to show Elmo all of the wonderful things you could do with a stick. Williams turns the stick into a hockey stick and a baton before losing his composure and walking off camera. The entire time, Elmo looks enthralled … if puppets can look enthralled. He’s definitely paying attention before slumping over at the realization that Williams goofed a line. But the actor comes back to continue the scene before Elmo slinks down inside his box after getting Williams’ name wrong, which causes his human co-star to take his stick and leave.

The little blooper reel is so cute and pure that it makes you feel good for a few minutes. For an additional boost of serotonin, check out this other (perfectly executed) clip about conflict that Williams did with the two-headed monster. He certainly had a way of engaging his audience, so it makes sense that even after all of these years, he's still greatly missed.

This article originally appeared on 08.21.18


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