Photo by Aiony Haust on Unsplash

A recent study conducted by the University of Florida's Pain Research and Intervention Center of Excellence suggests that we should rethink how women experience pain. Unfortunately, it holds up some other harmful beliefs as well.

In the study, researchers gave men and women the same intensity of pain and asked them to rate the sensation on a scale of one to ten. "On average, women report the same stimuli to be more painful than men," researcher Roger Fillingim told NPR.

The study indicates that men and women might require different treatments for pain, possibly in the form of gendered pain medications."[W]e need to understand what the mechanisms are that are female-specific or male-specific so that we can design more personalized therapies that are going to help reduce pain for women and men in the long run," Fillingim said.

Other studies have backed up Fillingim's findings. A study published in Brain "suggests presence of sex-specific differences and reveals gene modules and signaling pathways in immune response and neuronal plasticity related to radicular/neuropathic pain."

Keep Reading Show less
Science & Technology

Jo Cameron has been pain-free all her life — something many might dub a superpower of sorts.

While other women struggle with the pain that comes along with childbirth, when Cameron gave birth to her two children, she felt only “a tickle.” Later on in life, she didn’t realize she needed to have her hip replaced until she physically couldn’t walk. She also couldn’t tell she had been burned until others smelled burning flesh, and failed to notice cuts until someone else pointed out blood. Spicy foods — such as Scotch bonnet chili peppers — didn’t set her mouth on fire and instead left her with a “pleasant glow.”

Her body also heals more quickly than most, with her injuries rarely resulting in scars.

Keep Reading Show less
Heroes

Natasha Rossi believed she had the perfect life.

She had two awesome kids — two and a half-year-old identical twins — and the love and support of her boyfriend, Desi. Life, she thought, could only get better.

All photos via Upworthy/Walgreens.

Then, in January 2019, she was hit with some of the hardest news that anyone can hear.

Keep Reading Show less
feel more like you
True
Walgreens

My husband was leading a double life. How I fell apart, then found strength.

One woman's story of finding strength during divorce and deceit.

A few weeks after giving birth to my first baby, I was wracked with pain to the point that I could barely move.

Swinging my legs, one after another, out of bed took nearly all my willpower. This pain had nothing to do with the physical stress of childbirth or the stitches still holding my swollen private area together.

This pain came from a place so deep within me that I could not determine where the pain ended and I began. We were intertwined. It was all-consuming.

Keep Reading Show less
More