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medical care

Joy

An emotional Michael Jordan opens his first clinic for the uninsured and underinsured

"This is just the start of a battle of being able to touch as many people as we can."

Michael Jordan at the opening of his health clinic.

This article originally appeared on 11.05.19


Basketball great Michael Jordan made himself a global household name with his seemingly superhuman slam dunks and uncanny ability to score under pressure.

Now, 16 years into his retirement, his name is associated with something completely different—a medical clinic for uninsured and underinsured people in Charlotte, North Carolina.

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A new clinic geared toward St. Louis transgender teens hopes to be a sort of one-stop shop for supporting trans youth.

After opening the first week of August, St. Louis' Transgender Center of Excellence is already booked through mid-September. It's one location complete with mental health, hormones, and other essential services, and it's getting rave reviews from patients already.

"Having support and acceptance is extremely important for this patient population," Dr. Christopher Lewis, physician and founder of the clinic, told WGN News. "Transgender patients already deal with harassment and discrimination within the medical community and that is a barrier to them accessing care."

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True
Cigna 2017

Remember when doctors making house calls was a thing?

I mean, it feels like every other TV doctor still does it. But in real life, we don't see it all that often.

Image via iStock.

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Joss Whedon made a video to explain why Planned Parenthood is important. In 3 minutes.

Two different outcomes powerfully explain what happens when Planned Parenthood isn't around.

Ever wonder what would happen if the people who want to get Planned Parenthood shut down got their way?

In 2011, Texas cut off most of Planned Parenthood's funding in the state. Planned Parenthood served around 50,000 patients there at the time. The result? One-quarter of publicly funded health clinics shut down. And there was a 35% drop in claims for long-acting birth control. As a result, there was a 30% increase in Medicaid-paid births.

Women in Texas, particularly those in poverty, have seen a significant loss of access to health care services and birth control — which would prevent them from getting pregnant and potentially needing an abortion.

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