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It's hard being trans. It's even harder when you can't find a doctor. A new site hopes to fix that.

When 50% of trans people report having to educate their doctors on the basics of trans health care, there's a deeper problem.

It's hard being trans. It's even harder when you can't find a doctor. A new site hopes to fix that.

In 2011, the first ever National Transgender Discrimination Survey results were published.

The National Center for Transgender Equality and National LGBT Task Force teamed up to put together what is, to date, one of the most comprehensive looks at how trans people experience discrimination.

It's the source of some of the more alarming statistics you hear about trans people. For instance, the finding that 41% of trans people have attempted suicide? That comes from this report.


In August, the center will begin collecting data for the survey's follow-up.

And while there's a lot of talk about physical violence and employment discrimination against trans people, there's one aspect you don't hear much about: health care.

Nearly 20% of survey respondents reported having been refused care because they're transgender. More than 25% reported being harassed in a doctor's office, and 50% had to actually educate their doctors on aspects of trans health care.

"I have been refused emergency room treatment even when delivered to the hospital by ambulance with numerous broken bones and wounds," says one survey respondent.

GIF via MyTransHealth.

A group of four trans people have teamed up to provide a simple service: connect other folks with trans-friendly medical providers.

As a trans person, I can say that one of my biggest concerns when it comes to looking for a doctor is the worry that I'll be turned away or otherwise harassed.

And unfortunately, it's very hit or miss. There's really no way to know ahead of time how a medical provider will handle a trans patient. That's where MyTransHealth comes into play.

The team behind MyTransHealth is working to make health care more accessible by creating a database of trans-friendly medical providers around the country. The goal is to make finding a new doctor as easy as completing a few quick questions.

It's kind of like a trans-specific Yelp. GIF via MyTransHealth.

MyTransHealth plans to launch in two cities this fall, with more to follow.

The free service, which will initially be available in New York and Miami, works a bit like Yelp. Trans people will be able to submit medical professionals to the database and provide reviews. At the same time, the team behind the project plans to create materials to help educate the doctors who don't quite get it just yet.

"We're releasing in phases," co-founder Robyn Kanner told me in an e-mail. "First we need to work with the existing resources for the trans and gender non-conforming community and then look to our board of directors to develop training programs and educate additional doctors to provide competent care."

The team understands this is a pretty huge undertaking.

"We're trying to fix a big problem, and the best way to do this is to understand the landscape of the system, work within it, and help change it for the better," says Kanner.

Interesting in learning more? Check out MyTransHealth's video below.

via KrustyKhajiit / YouTube

Thomas F. Wilson played one of the most recognizable villains in film history, Biff Tannen, in the "Back to the Future" series. So, understandably, he gets recognized wherever he goes for the iconic role.

The attention must be nice, but it has to get exhausting answering the same questions day in and day out about the films. So Wilson created a card that he carries with him to hand out to people that answers all the questions he gets asked on a daily basis.

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Courtesy of FIELDTRIP
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The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected diverse communities due largely in part to social factors such as inadequate access to housing, income, dietary options, education and employment — all of which have been shown to affect people's physical health.

Recognizing that inequity, Harlem-based chef JJ Johnson sought out to help his community maximize its health during the pandemic — one grain at a time.

Johnson manages FIELDTRIP, a health-focused restaurant that strives to bring people together through the celebration of rice, a grain found in cuisines of countless cultures.

"It was very important for me to show the world that places like Harlem want access to more health-conscious foods," Johnson said. "The people who live in Harlem should have the option to eat fresh, locally farmed and delicious food that other communities have access to."

Lack of education and access to those healthy food options is a primary driver of why 31% of adults in Harlem are struggling with obesity — the highest rate of any neighborhood in New York City and 7% higher than the average adult obesity rate across the five boroughs.

Obesity increases risk for heart disease or diabetes, which in turn leaves Harlem's residents — who are 76% Black or LatinX — at heightened risk for complications with COVID-19.

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Sometimes a politician says or does something so brazenly gross that you have to do a double take to make sure it really happened. Take, for instance, this tweet from Lauren Witzke, a GOP candidate for the U.S. Senate from Delaware. Witzke defeated the party's endorsed candidate to win the primary, has been photographed in a QAnon t-shirt, supports the conspiracy theory that 9/11 was a U.S. government inside operation, and has called herself a flat earther.

So that's neat.

Witzke has also proposed a 10-year total halt on immigration to the U.S., which is absurd on its face, but makes sense when you see what she believes about immigrants. In a tweet this week, Witzke wrote, "Most third-world migrants can not assimilate into civil societies. Prove me wrong."

First, let's talk about how "civil societies" and developing nations are not different things, and to imply that they are is racist, xenophobic, and wrong. Not to mention, it has never been a thing to refer people using terms like "third-world." That's a somewhat outdated term for developing nations, and it was never an adjective to describe people from those nations even when it was in use.

Next, let's see how Twitter thwapped Lauren Witzke straight into the 21st century by proving her wrong in the most delicious way. Not only did people share how they or their relatives and friends have successfully "assimilated," but many showed that they went way, way beyond that.

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via WatchMojo / YouTube

There are two conflicting viewpoints when it comes to addressing culture from that past that contains offensive elements that would never be acceptable today.

Some believe that old films, TV shows, music or books with out-of-date, offensive elements should be hidden from public view. While others think they should be used as valuable tools that help us learn from the past.

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