+
More

It's hard being trans. It's even harder when you can't find a doctor. A new site hopes to fix that.

When 50% of trans people report having to educate their doctors on the basics of trans health care, there's a deeper problem.

In 2011, the first ever National Transgender Discrimination Survey results were published.

The National Center for Transgender Equality and National LGBT Task Force teamed up to put together what is, to date, one of the most comprehensive looks at how trans people experience discrimination.

It's the source of some of the more alarming statistics you hear about trans people. For instance, the finding that 41% of trans people have attempted suicide? That comes from this report.


In August, the center will begin collecting data for the survey's follow-up.

And while there's a lot of talk about physical violence and employment discrimination against trans people, there's one aspect you don't hear much about: health care.

Nearly 20% of survey respondents reported having been refused care because they're transgender. More than 25% reported being harassed in a doctor's office, and 50% had to actually educate their doctors on aspects of trans health care.

"I have been refused emergency room treatment even when delivered to the hospital by ambulance with numerous broken bones and wounds," says one survey respondent.

GIF via MyTransHealth.

A group of four trans people have teamed up to provide a simple service: connect other folks with trans-friendly medical providers.

As a trans person, I can say that one of my biggest concerns when it comes to looking for a doctor is the worry that I'll be turned away or otherwise harassed.

And unfortunately, it's very hit or miss. There's really no way to know ahead of time how a medical provider will handle a trans patient. That's where MyTransHealth comes into play.

The team behind MyTransHealth is working to make health care more accessible by creating a database of trans-friendly medical providers around the country. The goal is to make finding a new doctor as easy as completing a few quick questions.

It's kind of like a trans-specific Yelp. GIF via MyTransHealth.

MyTransHealth plans to launch in two cities this fall, with more to follow.

The free service, which will initially be available in New York and Miami, works a bit like Yelp. Trans people will be able to submit medical professionals to the database and provide reviews. At the same time, the team behind the project plans to create materials to help educate the doctors who don't quite get it just yet.

"We're releasing in phases," co-founder Robyn Kanner told me in an e-mail. "First we need to work with the existing resources for the trans and gender non-conforming community and then look to our board of directors to develop training programs and educate additional doctors to provide competent care."

The team understands this is a pretty huge undertaking.

"We're trying to fix a big problem, and the best way to do this is to understand the landscape of the system, work within it, and help change it for the better," says Kanner.

Interesting in learning more? Check out MyTransHealth's video below.

Finally, someone explains why we all need subtitles

It seems everyone needs subtitles nowadays in order to "hear" the television. This is something that has become more common over the past decade and it's caused people to question if their hearing is going bad or if perhaps actors have gotten lazy with enunciation.

So if you've been wondering if it's just you who needs subtitles in order to watch the latest marathon-worthy show, worry no more. Vox video producer Edward Vega interviewed dialogue editor Austin Olivia Kendrick to get to the bottom of why we can't seem to make out what the actors are saying anymore. It turns out it's technology's fault, and to get to how we got here, Vega and Kendrick took us back in time.

They first explained that way back when movies were first moving from silent film to spoken dialogue, actors had to enunciate and project loudly while speaking directly into a large microphone. If they spoke and moved like actors do today, it would sound almost as if someone were giving a drive-by soliloquy while circling the block. You'd only hear every other sentence or two.

Keep ReadingShow less

Tater Tots, fresh out of the oven.

It’s hard to imagine growing up in America without Tater Tots. They are one of the most popular kiddie foods, right up there with chicken nuggets, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and macaroni and cheese. The funny thing is the only reason Tater Tots exist is that their creators needed something to do with leftover food waste.

The Tater Tot is the brainchild of two Mormon brothers, F. Nephi and Golden Grigg, who started a factory on the Oregon-Idaho border that they appropriately named Ore-Ida. The brothers started the factory in 1951 after being convinced that frozen foods were the next big thing.

According to Eater, between 1945 and 1946, Americans bought 800 million pounds of frozen food.

Keep ReadingShow less
Pop Culture

One moment in history shot Tracy Chapman to music stardom. Watch it now.

She captivated millions with nothing but her guitar and an iconic voice.

Imagine being in the crowd and hearing "Fast Car" for the first time

While a catchy hook might make a song go viral, very few songs create such a unifying impact that they achieve timeless resonance. Tracy Chapman’s “Fast Car” is one of those songs.

So much courage and raw honesty is packed into the lyrics, only to be elevated by Chapman’s signature androgynous and soulful voice. Imagine being in the crowd and seeing her as a relatively unknown talent and hearing that song for the first time. Would you instantly recognize that you were witnessing a pivotal moment in musical history?

For concert goers at Wembley Stadium in the late 80s, this was the scenario.

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

Developmental scientist shared her 'anti-parenting advice' and parents are relieved

In a viral Twitter thread, Dorsa Amir addresses the "extreme pressure put on parents in the West."

Photo by kabita Darlami on Unsplash, @DorsaAmir/Twitter

Parents, maybe give yourselves a break

For every grain of sand on all the world’s beaches, for every star in the known universe…there is a piece of well-intentioned but possibly stress-inducing parenting advice.

Whether it’s the astounding number of hidden dangers that parents might be unwittingly exposing their child to, or the myriad ways they might be missing on maximizing every moment of interaction, the internet is teeming with so much information that it can be impossible for parents to feel like they’re doing enough to protect and nurture their kids.

However, developmental scientist and mom Dorsa Amir has a bit of “anti-parenting advice” that help parents worry a little less about how they’re measuring up.

First and foremost—not everything has to be a learning opportunity. Honestly, this wisdom also applies to adults who feel the need to be consistently productive…raises hand while doing taxes and listening to a podcast on personal development
Keep ReadingShow less

A guy with road rage screaming out of his car.

A psychologist who’s an expert in narcissism has released a telling video that reveals one of the red flags of the disorder, being an erratic driver.

"Most people, when they tell the story backwards of a narcissistic relationship, are able to see the red flags very clearly,” Dr. Ramani said in her video. “However, seeing them forwards isn't hard. But if you see them too late, it means you've already been through the narcissistic relationship, you're devastated and have likely wasted a lot of time."

Dr. Ramani Durvasula is a licensed clinical psychologist in Los Angeles, Professor Emerita of Psychology at California State University and author of several books, including “Should I Stay or Should I Go: Surviving A Relationship with a Narcissist.”

Keep ReadingShow less
www.youtube.com

Man hailed 'Highway Hero' for running across four lanes of traffic

Holy cow, Bat Man! You're always supposed to be aware of other vehicles when you're driving but what do you do when you notice someone has lost consciousness while speeding down the highway?

It's a scenario that no one wants to see play out, but for Adolfo Molina, the scenario became reality and he didn't hesitate to spring into action. Molina was driving down the highway when he spotted a woman in a blue car who lost consciousness as her car careened down the shoulder of the highway. The concerned driver quickly pulled over in order to attempt to rescue the woman.

But there was a problem, he had to cross four lanes of traffic on the highway just to make it to the woman's still moving car. That obstacle didn't stop him. Molina sprinted across the highway, crossing right in front of a black pick up truck before running at full speed to attempt to open the woman's door and stop her car.

Keep ReadingShow less