+
heimlich maneuver, david diaz, choking

A diagram on how to perform the Heimlich maneuver.

ABC’s “The Good Doctor” is centered around Dr. Shaun Murphy, a man with autism whose near photographic recall and ability to remember details make him an incredible surgeon. However, as a person with autism, he has difficulty communicating with his patients and fellow healthcare workers.

It’s a good show for families to watch because it takes on issues faced by people who have autism spectrum disorder. The show is also a great way for young people to learn life-saving techniques, according to a story reported by Fox News.

David Diaz Jr., 7, was eating lunch with his friend DeAndre at Woodrow Wilson Elementary school in Binghamton, New York, when he noticed his friend choking on a piece of pizza. David looked around and saw that he was closer than any of his teachers, so he got behind the choking child and performed the Heimlich maneuver.

David had learned the technique after watching “The Good Doctor” with his father, David Diaz Sr.


"The adults were circulating the cafeteria, monitoring," Kristin Korba, a second-grade teacher at the school, told Fox News. "David rushed behind [the choking student] and performed the Heimlich. "I went over right after it happened and checked [on the student]," Korba continued. "He was cleared by the nurse and parents [were] contacted."

After saving the boy’s life, David told Korba that he saw the technique on TV and thought it was something he should remember because it seemed to be something “important.”

David was commemorated for his bravery at a ceremony in his classroom where New York State Sen. Fred Akshar (R) presented him with a New York State Senate Commendation Award.

"When somebody needed it, you saved their life," Akshar told the boy in a video he posted to Facebook. "So I was pretty excited to be able to come because really, as your teacher said, you are a hero. You are. You saved somebody’s life. In the world in which we live it's nice to know there are people amongst us who are willing to give of themselves and help others and that's what you did."

Then he presented him with the award in front of his cheering classmates and DeAndre.

While it is pretty astonishing that a 7-year-old kid not only knew about the Heimlich maneuver, but how to successfully apply the technique, experts say it’s age-appropriate. The Heimlich Heroes foundation has training guides that teach children as young as the second grade to help people who are choking.

“Everyone can learn the Heimlich maneuver, regardless of size and strength,” the organization says on its website.

After his act of bravery, David’s dad isn’t discounting a career in medicine for his young son.

"If he’d like to pursue becoming a doctor when he grows up, I'll be happy to help him achieve that later in life. But it’s really up to him," Diaz Sr. said.

The Heimlich maneuver was developed by Dr. Henry Heimlich more than 40 years ago and has saved hundreds of thousands of lives.

Learn more about how to perform the Heimlich maneuver at Mayo Clinic.







Photo by Stormseeker on Unsplash

Some cries for help can be hard to discern.

“I’m fine.”

How easily these two words slip from our mouths, often when nothing could be further from the truth. Sometimes, it feels safer to hide our true feelings, lest someone make a judgment or have a negative reaction. Other times, it’s a social rule instilled in childhood, perhaps even through punishment. Or maybe denying is the only way to combat overwhelm—if we ignore it all long enough, things will eventually get better anyway.

At the end of the day … it’s all about avoiding further pain, isn’t it?

But this denial can lead to even more suffering—not only emotionally, but physically as well. Everything from stiff muscles, to migraines, to digestive issues can stem from suppressing emotions.

Keep ReadingShow less
Joy

10 things that made us smile this week

Upworthy's weekly roundup of joy and delight.

From stellar sportsmanship to corntastic kiddos to adorable animals, enjoy the best of the internet this week.

Wait. Are we really almost halfway through August already? Didn't I just write one of these intros talking about how summer had arrived? What the heck happened???

Time flies when you're having fun, I guess, and these weekly roundups are nothing but fun. Every day it seems like we're bombarded with something new to stress about or be outraged over, but not here. In this space, we celebrate simple joys, awesome humans, hilarious animals and all things smile-worthy.

This week alone, we've seen sportsmanship that inspired us, parenting that touched our hearts and kiddos that tickled our funny bones. Readers have told us they look forward to our 10 things roundup every week, which is good because we have no intention of stopping. (Honestly, it's therapeutic to pull this list together, so win-win all around!)

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

How breastfeeding actually works is seriously awe-inspiring

Let's take a moment to marvel at this miraculous process.

A viral video shows what's happening beneath the surface when a baby breastfeeds.

Let me start by saying I don't care whether you breastfeed or not. Everyone's circumstances are different, no one needs to explain why they did or didn't breastfeed their babies and we'd all be better off with far fewer judgments across the baby-feeding spectrum.

With that disclaimer out of the way, can we at least all agree that breastfeeding is freaking awesome?

I mean, the whole biological process of growing an entire human practically from scratch is mind-blowing all by itself. But the fact that our bodies then create food to feed that human, with a whole system for how and when that food gets made and released, is just so cool.

Keep ReadingShow less