A teenager having a seizure in the UK was saved by an online gamer 5,000 miles away in Texas
via Kontaku / Twitter

An unusual story out of England shows just how interconnected the world is in 2020.

On January 2, 17-year-old Aidan Jackson of Widnes, England, just outside of Liverpool, was chatting and playing an online game with his friend, Dia Lathora, from Texas. Aidan was alone in his bedroom upstairs, while his parents were on the first floor watching television.

Aidan is a student studying graphics and photography with a recent history of seizures. At around 9 pm that night, Aidan began making sounds that didn't sound right to Dia.

"I just put my headset back on and I heard what I could only describe as a seizure, so obviously I started to get worried and immediately started asking what was going on and if he was OK," Dia told the Liverpool Echo.


Dia knew Aidan's address but didn't have his phone number so there was no way he could reach his parents.

"When he didn't respond I instantly started to look up the emergency number for the EU," Dia said. "When that didn't work I just had to hope the non-emergency would work, it had an option for talking to a real person...and I can't tell you how quickly I clicked that button."

Aidan's parents were completely shocked when at 9:40 pm, two police cars pulled up to their home and officers marched up to their door.

"I assumed they were in the area for another reason and then they ran up to the front door," Aidan's mother, Caroline Jackson, said.

"They said there was an unresponsive male at the address. We said we hadn't called anyone and they said a call had come from America," she continued. "I immediately went to check on Aidan and found him extremely disorientated."

Dia had stayed online with Aidan while he was unresponsive and was relieved when she heard his mother talking to him in his room.

"The most surreal thing was hearing his mum come upstairs with the medical team, hearing them talk to him, asking if he's doing OK, saying that I had just called them saying he had a seizure," Dia said.

Aidan was rushed to the hospital where he was treated for the seizure. Aidan is home now and his family looks forward to his next doctor's appointment when they will learn more about his recent seizures. "Aidan is a lot better and hopefully everything is OK when he has his appointment at the hospital but he's doing well," his mother said.

His family is very grateful for Dia's decision to spring into action to help her friend across the pond.

"We are extremely thankful for what Dia did and shocked that we could be downstairs and not know anything was happening," Caroline added. "I've spoken to her and expressed our thanks — she's just glad she could help.

Photo courtesy of Macy's
True

Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Sam Carter on Unsplash
white sheep on green grass during daytime

Heroes don't always wear capes. Some sport a viking beard with a tank top.

A video went viral on Twitter yesterday of a man who in my mind shall be called Sheep Thor. In the video, Sheep Thor steps out of his car after seeing a helpless lamb struggling to release itself from the death grip of a barbed wire fence. We see Sheep Thor step out of the car and grab both sides of the sheep with his bare hands, gently trying to pull it out.

Alas, no buck wouldn't budge. The camera zooms in on the poor beast, still stuck in the fence, and Sheep Thor gives a narration that would fill Crocodile Hunter fans with nostalgia. "So he's got this barbed wire here, he's got his horns caught behind the wire...gotta be careful." He then takes a horn and gingerly works it back through the wire. Despite Sheep Thor's requests to "hurry up buddy," the ram doesn't seem too keen on aiding his rescuer.

Keep Reading Show less