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deaf community

Santa hands a gift to a little girl.

It has to be incredibly frustrating to be a deaf child who can’t tell Santa exactly what they want for Christmas. That’s why a community’s work to ensure that Emily Andrews, 4, from East Yorkshire, England, had a British Sign Language (BSL) translator at a Santa event was so special.

A video shared by Southwest News Service shows Andrews speaking to Santa with the help of Melanie Boyeson, also known as Holly the Elf, who knows BSL. Through Boyeson, Emily could tell Santa that she wanted a doll, a stroller, earrings and a ring on Christmas morning.

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Mohammad Aizad Bin Ariffin just got a promotion, and it means he's "well on his way to achieving [his] dream."

He wants to become the first deaf Starbucks store manager in Malaysia, and now — as the new shift manager at a location in Kuala Lumpur — that goal is in sight.

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Can you dance to a song if you can't hear the music? Watch and see.

You can't stop the beat. Even when you can't hear it.

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Smirnoff

Chris lives to dance but he can't hear the music.

Turn up good music, and you won't just hear it in your ears. It'll fill your whole being. You'll feel the bass thump in your chest. The hairs on your arms and the back of your neck will start vibrating in time to the beat. All around you, the air comes alive, moving. Pretty soon, you are too.

That’s true for Chris Fonseca too, with one small difference. Check it out or scroll down for more:

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On Tuesday, April 19, U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts said, "Your motion is granted" in court. Sound typical? It's not.

Because for the first time in U.S. history, these words were spoken from the Supreme Court bench in American Sign Language.

To most people, that probably doesn't sound like a big deal. After all, it's just one little phrase, right? And it's not like he said something cool like "Awkward turtle" or "My hovercraft is full of eels" either.

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