Meet the the 11-year-old Nigerian artist making jaws drop around the world.

In a makeshift art studio in an impoverished area of Lagos, Nigeria, Kareem Waris Olamilekan stands before an easel, sketching a face in charcoal. His eyes dart back and forth from a photograph to his canvas while his hands deftly recreate what he sees.

The finished product is stunning — a boy's face dripping with sweat, his eyes closed as he eats from a large spoon. It's Olamilekan's favorite drawing, which he calls "Daily Bread." He says it represents his family, who works hard before they put food in their mouths. "The sweat on it symbolizes hard work and struggling ... and the spoon symbolizes food."

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When Stamy Paul started traveling for work over a decade ago, she fell in love with urban art in all its forms — including graffiti.

"It was really fascinating to me because it was evident in every culture and country I visited," Paul says.

That's why she was determined to figure out how to bring it into her own home. Unfortunately that was easier said than done.

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NBC's Rise

Amanda Sandlin is only 27, but she's lived in a van, on a ship, and on both ends of the world.

And not in a clichéd, "quit your job and pursue your dreams" sort of way. In fact, through hard work and determination, she's found a way to make adventuring her job. You could almost call adventuring her family's business.

Photo by Kris Holbrook, used with permission.

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Nature Valley

Tatiana von Furstenberg laid out more than 4,000 works of art on the floor of her apartment and was immediately struck by what she saw.

The pieces of artwork were submitted from various prisons across the country in hopes of being featured in "On the Inside," an exhibition of artwork by currently incarcerated LGBTQ inmates, curated by von Furstenberg and Black and Pink, a nonprofit organization that supports the LGBTQ community behind bars. The exhibit was held at the Abrons Arts Center in Manhattan toward the end of 2016.

"I put all the submissions on the floor and I saw that there were all these loving ones, these signs of affection, all of these two-spirit expressions of gender identity, and fairies and mermaids," von Furstenberg said.

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