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Some people think the minimum wage should be $15. Let's see how it stacks up to the current minimum.

Here are two workers. One earns today's minimum wage of $7.25. The other lives in a hypothetical happy land where the minimum wage is $15.

Some people think the minimum wage should be $15. Let's see how it stacks up to the current minimum.

The current federal minimum wage is $7.25 an hour.

That's about $15,080 per year (before taxes).


Image via Fight for $15.

A lot of people think we should raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour.

That's about $31,200 per year (also before taxes). Now, how big of a deal is that extra $7.75 an hour? Let's find out.

We'll start with the monthly costs of just a few basic living expenses. And to keep things simple, we'll focus on the average costs for a single person.

BIG DISCLAIMER: Everyone's experience is different. These are crudely assembled hypothetical scenarios to help us simply consider the relative impact of a $15 minimum wage.

FOOD: The U.S. Department of Agriculture says the food costs for a single man are $188 to $373 per month. The range for single women is $167 to $331 per month. Since I'm a guy, I'll just use that figure. (No offense, ladies.) And let's assume some serious penny-pinching here by going with the low end.

HOUSING: There's a general rule of thumb that affordable housing should be no more than one-third of a person's income. That's getting harder to achieve in an age of flat (or declining) incomes and skyrocketing housing costs, but let's just run with it for the sake of comparison.

FUEL: The average consumer spent just over $2,400 on gasoline in 2013, according to the Consumer Expenditure Survey (divided by 12 months).

Food, housing, and fuel costs alone soaked up nearly two-thirds (64%) of the monthly earnings of the $7.25-an-hour worker.

The $15-an-hour worker spent less than half (48%) of their income on the same needs.

Again, this is PRE-TAX. So these figures are a little more generous than the reality. But food, housing, and fuel aren't the only things we spend money on, right?

We have utilities, phone bills, car payments, insurance premiums, and medical bills. We pay for all sorts of small necessities that can really add up. And if you do have a family, then you definitely don't need me to tell you that raising a kid is not cheap.

And what about savings and planning for a better future — that whole "pursuit of happiness" thing? It's looking pretty impossible on $7.25 an hour.

Damn you, Skipper! Image via KnowYourMeme.

A $15 minimum wage would lift millions of people out of poverty.

But it wouldn't just be a win for the workers — it would be for all U.S. taxpayers:

  • According to Americans for Tax Fairness, "Walmart pays its employees so little that many of them rely on food stamps, health care and other taxpayer-funded programs" — to the tune of $6.2 billion a year.

Call me old-fashioned, but an honest day's work should provide for everything workers need now with some left for their future — not leave them grasping for welfare straws.

If you agree, share this post and join the fight for $15.

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Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Photo by Adelin Preda on Unsplash

A multinational study found that bystanders intervene in 9 out of 10 public conflicts.

The recent news report of a woman on a Philadelphia train being raped while onlookers did nothing to stop it was shocking and horrible, without question. It also got people discussing the infamous "bystander effect," which has led people to believe—somewhat erroneously, as it turns out—that people aren't likely to intervene when they see someone being attacked in public. Stories like this uninterrupted train assault combined with a belief that bystanders rarely step in can easily lead people to feel like everything and everyone is horrible.

But according to the most recent research on the subject, the Philadelphia incident appears to be the exception, not the rule. A 2019 multinational study found that at least one bystander (but usually more) will actually intervene in 9 out of 10 public conflicts.

The idea that people in groups aren't likely to intervene stems largely from research on the 1964 story of Kitty Genovese, a 28-year-old woman who was stabbed to death outside her apartment in New York, while dozens of onlookers in surrounding apartment buildings allegedly did nothing. However, further research has called the number of witnesses into question, and it appears that several did, in fact, call the police. Someone reportedly shouted out their window and scared the attacker away for a few minutes, and someone did rush to Genovese's aid after the second attack.

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