For many, Disneyland means magic and wonder. One group of Australian singers has a different take.

Their name? The Sisters of Invention.


The top three things you should know about this cool band (besides the fact they're Aussies!):

  1. Their names are Annika, Michelle, Jackie, Aimee, and Caroline.
  2. All 5 of them have learning disabilities.
  3. Most important, they write songs about how their learning disabilities don't make them novelties.

These singers are bold and unafraid.

In the music video for their song, "This Isn't Disneyland," they make a very powerful point.

Here are some of the best lines from the song:

"This isn't Disneyland. I'm not novelty. This is as real as it gets. For you I just begin to fill all the detail in; I am as real as it gets. I won't let go of the hope that I am holding when trouble is unfolding stand or crash-land. I'm not, I'm not a novelty."

But while the lyrics are cool, the visuals REALLY pack a punch.

For example, they snap fairy godmother wands:

And they snip off hair:

Then, whoa! Goofy is on fire:

The Sisters of Invention are anything but afraid to push it.

We don't condone setting things on fire, and the singers' point is not to bash Disneyland. The real point is to challenge ideas of what performers "should" look like — performers who are anything but like Disneyland princesses. Disneyland becomes a symbol for a world that doesn't look at reality or that won't accept people as they are. They're also not just throwing things or breaking them for the heck of it.

These singers want to (not literally) burn and tear things down to change they are perceived.

And that's a good thing.

Here's the music video in all its glory:

via Lady A / Twitter and Whittlz / Flickr

In one of the most glaringly hypocritical moves in recent history, the band formerly known as Lady Antebellum is suing black blues singer Anita "Lady A" White, to use her stage name she's performed under for over three decades.

Lady Antebellum announced it had changed its name to Lady A on June 11 as part of its commitment to "examining our individual and collective impact and marking the necessary changes to practice antiracism."

Antebellum refers to an era in the American south before the civil war when black people were held as slaves.

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