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OBGYN explains the eyebrow-raising reason you're not allowed to eat during labor

"Let's talk about forcing laboring people to have no food, sometimes for DAYS, during labor admissions."

OBGYN; labor and delivery; labor; hospital policy; new mom; doctor explains

OBGYN explains the eyebrow-raising reason you can't eat during labor

If you've ever delivered a baby in the hospital or been a part of someone's support system while they gave birth, then you know that American hospitals generally have a strict policy on not eating while in labor. As someone who had children in a hospital, not being able to eat while in pain can make you feel absolutely feral. Weak, but feral.

Most people I know who have had babies don't understand the seemingly nationwide hospital policy on depriving birthing people of food right before they push an entire human out of their bodies. Delivering a baby is not a bystander event for the one doing the pushing, so restricting calories is a confusing practice.

Turns out there's a reason for this strange practice, and honestly, I can't promise that it won't make you angry. Dr. Danielle Jones, board-certified OB-GYN, breaks down why doctors started this practice in a video uploaded to her YouTube channel, Mama Doctor Jones.


Jones starts the video by explaining that the practice of not allowing people giving birth to eat began around the same time they stopped using chloroform to reduce pain during labor. I mean, I suppose you couldn't feel any pain if you were unconscious, so the 40s were off to a swimming start.


In 1946, Dr. Curtis Mendelson published a paper focusing on labor complications, in which he revealed that the aspiration risk during pregnancy was 0.15%.

"Aspiration is where you inhale stomach contents into the lungs. That can be extremely dangerous. It can kill you. It often doesn't kill you but it certainly can," Jones explains. "The risk of aspiration comes along mainly when we're talking about needing to do a cesarian delivery or some kind of surgery on someone who is pregnant under a general anesthetic."

Obviously, in 1946, it was a little riskier to have a baby and maternal mortality was atrociously high. This isn't the case anymore and general anesthesia for a cesarian is very rarely used, so the risk of aspiration is even lower.

The obstetric risk of aspiration, "was based on two deaths from aspiration in 40,000 pregnancies in 1946," Jones continued. "For those following who like the numbers, the risk of dying from obstetric aspiration in 1946 when it was magnitudes more common to die from pregnancy and also anesthetic techniques made it easier to aspirate was 0.0045%."

So...what she's saying is, I probably could've eaten that cheeseburger because it's not 1946, and not only do doctors know to wash their hands before surgery, but they also have better techniques for anesthesia? Hmmm...

Watch the whole video below to see if maybe hospitals should allow a little snacky-snack between contractions.

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After over a thousand years of peaceful relations, European semi-superpowers Sweden and Switzerland may finally address a lingering issue between the two nations. But the problem isn’t either country’s fault. The point is that the rest of the world can’t tell them apart. They simply don’t know their kroppkakor (Swedish potato dumpling) from their birchermüesli (a Swiss breakfast dish).

This confusion on the European continent has played out in countless ways.

Swedish people who move to the United States often complain of being introduced as Swiss. The New York Stock Exchange has fallen victim to the confusion, and a French hockey team once greeted their Swiss opponents, SC Bern, by playing the Swedish National Anthem and raising the Swedish flag.

Skämtar du med mig? (“Are you kidding me?” in Swedish)

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SNL sketch about George Washington's dream for America hailed an 'instant classic'

"People will be referencing it as one of the all time best SNL skits for years.”

Saturday Night Live/Youtube

Seriously, what were our forefathers thinking with our measuring system?

Ever stop to think how bizarre it is that the United States is one of the only countries to not use the metric system? Or how it uses the word “football” to describe a sport that, unlike fútbol, barely uses the feet at all?

What must our forefathers have been thinking as they were creating this brave new world?

Wonder no further. All this and more is explored in a recent Saturday Night Live sketch that folks are hailing as an “instant classic.”
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Woman's mom makes surprise visit to baby shower but she hilariously keeps overlooking her

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Sometimes we get caught up in the moment and overlook details that are right in front of our faces. It's usually little things, like forgetting a bag or not remembering what your spouse was wearing. But sometimes, we overlook some pretty significant things and it's something that can really only be explained by excitement.

A moment like that was caught on video and shared with LADbible on social media.

One woman having a baby shower was doing her duties greeting guests who arrived, particularly excited about a pair of friends that showed up. Hugs, smiles and greetings flowed while one person stood awkwardly to the side hoping the pregnant woman would stop to notice her. The woman sort of smiled as she watched the mom-to-be gush over her friends as she hugged their necks. It didn't take long before the pregnant woman looked in the direction of the person waiting to be greeted.

But it didn't register who was waiting patiently for a hug, until again, she looked in the direction of the woman waiting. Nope. Still didn't click.

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Viral post thoughtfully reexamines Kerri Strug's iconic broken ankle vault at 1996 Olympics

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Simone Biles withdrawing from the team final in the Tokyo Olympics and subsequently withdrawing from the individual all-around finals after getting a case of the "twisties" has the world talking. She's received overwhelming support as well as overwhelming criticism for the move, with some praising her for recognizing her limits and others blasting her for not persevering through whatever she's dealing with.

Some people pointed to Kerri Strug, who landed on one foot after vaulting with a broken ankle in the 1996 Olympics to help the U.S. win gold, as an example of the kind of sacrifice an athlete should be willing to make for their country.

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Mom wants to know when Halloween became 'an adult pub crawl'?

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Celeste Yvonne had a recent Halloween realization.

Celeste Yvonne, a certified recovery coach and a founding host of the Sober Mom Squad, had a Halloween realization and wanted to know if she was the only person who felt the same.

“This morning, I'm listening to parents at the school drop-off area talk about how they will be bringing a keg onto their golf carts when they do the trick-or-treating rounds with their kids this year,” Yvonne says in a viral TikTok video.

“I'm not shaming them, but my question is: when did trick-or-treating become a beer crawl or pub crawl for adults?” she asked. “This is a newer phenomenon, isn't it? Or have parents always done this, and they're just being more public about it now?”

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SpecsaversOfficial/Youtube

"Then I'm gonna give you up…then I'm gonna let you down.."

Rick Astley fans, rejoice. The singer has just released a new recording of his biggest hit “Never Gonna Give You Up” on Oct 24.

Only this version might be…a little different than what you’re used to hearing. Unless of course you’ve been hearing it wrong this entire time.

That’s because this version incorporates all the commonly misheard lyrics associated with the 80s bop. Cause why not?



In the new version of the track, you might notice “we’re no strangers to love” being replaced by “we’re no strangers to lunch,” as well as Astley, for some reason, singing “your aunt’s naked” and belting about running around with dessert spoons.

Listen:

That’s right, “don’t tell me not to plant a seed,” indeed! Free gardening for all!

Of course, this is more than just a fun cover. Astley partnered up with Specsavers to raise awareness of hearing loss—something the 80s icon struggles with himself and currently wears hearing aids to help with the condition.

In an interview with Alison Hammond and Dermot O’Leary on “This Morning,” Astley shared that he first started noticing issues while performing live shows again.

“I went to have my ears checked. I have noticed over the last few years, and we have in-ears when we play live and I’ve been turning them down over the past few years because I’ve noticed that it’s been too loud when I come off stage. I can hear it ringing,” he said.

Specsavers conducted a survey on 2,000 adults, and found that a little over 16% blamed their hearing for getting lyrics wrong. Meanwhile 28% admitted having difficulty hearing the TV or radio properly. And a whooping 51% find conversations with background noise difficult. (Daily Mail)

And yet, over half of the participants had never had their hearing tested. The reasoning for this could be twofold.

One, people might assume that only those like Astley, who’ve spent a majority of their life surrounded by loud noise, could be susceptible to hearing loss (in actuality, about one-third of older adults have hearing loss, and the chance of developing hearing loss increases with age). So they might not think that a misheard lyric here or there could be a sign of a larger issue.

And two, some people might not want to admit that they are having hearing loss, embarrassed at the notion of having to wear hearing aids and being perceived as old or disabled.

And that’s why Specsavers sought the help of a pop icon in their campaign—to break any stigma surrounding hearing aids and inspire others to get their hearing tested.

“I’d encourage anyone to get their hearing tested if they notice any changes,” says Astley, “so they don’t lose the sounds or music they love.”

Kelly Manno explains the '80s "garbage bag" costume.

In 2023, Americans are expected to spend more than $12 billion on Halloween and more say they will participate in the holiday than ever before. While it may seem like Americans have always gone all out during the spooky season, things used to be simpler.

Anyone who is a Gen Xer will remember that, for most kids, Halloween meant going to the local drug store and picking a vinyl Halloween costume off the rack that cost $3. For that, you got a vinyl jumpsuit that smelled like paint and a plastic mask held on by a string, and you loved it.

TikTok’s unofficial Gen X ambassador, Kelly Manno, remembered those good times in a recently posted video with over 4 million views. She shared what it was like to go trick-or-treating in a "garbage bag" costume with little ventilation that made a “woosh-woosh” sound when you walked.

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