Meet the doctor spreading her preventive care message to the entire country.
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Cigna 2017

LaTasha Seliby first knew that she wanted to become a doctor after her aunt passed away at a very young age.

Her aunt had died of a "very, very preventable" ailment that could have been treated if she had just gotten the proper care. And when Seliby realized that, it lit a fire inside of her.

All images via Cigna.


After all, family always came first for her. That's why, soon after the incident, she decided to dedicate her life to health care and make sure nothing like what happened to her aunt ever happened again — to her family and to others.

"I wanted to be kind of a catalyst of change," says Seliby. And today, that's exactly what she is.

Because on top of being an accomplished physician, Seliby is also creating change in ways that go beyond the definition of her profession. In fact, you can see exactly how she's doing that in the amazing video below:

This is a day in the life of a doctor who is trying to make preventive health care the norm.

Posted by Upworthy on Friday, July 28, 2017

Seliby is redefining how we think about health care by putting preventive care at the heart of everything she does.

"Medicine has been looked at as sick care — you go to the doctor, and you find out what's wrong," she explains. "What I want to do is change that. Let's go to the doctor and find out everything that's right — and how to keep it right."

What's one easy way to do that?  Well, you can start by keeping an eye on your health before something goes wrong. Head to your doctor for a regular check-up and know your four health numbers — blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar, and body mass index (BMI). That way, you can easily spot red flags and worry less when it comes to your health.

Taking care of yourself, though, is especially important for young people.

With the modern world becoming faster than ever and the daily grind for many getting more pressure-packed by the minute, it can be easy for a young person to let their well-being fall by the wayside. In fact, in a survey conducted by Zocdoc, 9 in 10 millennials admitted to avoiding regular doctor visits — skipping check-ups and screenings altogether.

And that's exactly what Seliby wants to change. Because consistent visits to your primary care provider, according to a study by UCLA, can lead to fewer ER visits and hospitalizations in the long run.

That's why Seliby is taking her mission to Capitol Hill to get the word on preventive care out to the entire country.

She regularly speaks with various lawmakers about how she can translate her firsthand experience into actionable bills that get as many people as possible understanding the value of preventive care.

"You feel like you're a part of a bigger purpose when you're able to go speak to lawmakers about things that will affect entire populations," she says.

And she's not stopping there.

Seliby is also affecting countless lives through her work as a writer and editor for Heart and Soul magazine, a national publication that "focuses on women of color, health prevention, fitness, and wellness."

Everything Seliby does is about one thing: getting people to take care of themselves before they get sick.

It's the first step needed to redefining how we all view health care. And it's the step that Seliby has worked her entire professional life to help everyone take.

Because if more people are able to practice regular preventive care moving forward, the more "catalysts of change" we'll see for generations to come.

"I feel like I'm doing what I said I want to do," says Seliby. "And I'm working to leave the legacy that I really want to leave."

Learn more about how to take control of your health at Cigna.com/TakeControl.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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In other words, the average cheap ballpoint pen is out. (See? Snob.)

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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