Jennifer Lawrence hasn't forgotten about Catt Sadler. Neither should we.

Jennifer Lawrence just made it abundantly clear she hasn't been too happy with E! Network lately.

Chatting with Howard Stern about her new film, "Red Sparrow," and the Academy Awards coming up March 4, Lawrence dug into the entertainment network's handling of pay inequity and the negative effects of one of its most notable shows, "Fashion Police."

Photo by Monica Schipper/Getty Images for The Win.


Last year, former E! News co-host Catt Sadler discovered her male counterpart, Jason Kennedy, was earning nearly double her pay, even though they had similar levels of experience and on-air responsibilities. After the network refused to raise her salary to an even remotely comparable figure, Sadler quit.

"I have two decades experience in broadcasting and started at the network the very same year as my close friend and colleague that I adore," Sadler said in a statement. "But how can I operate with integrity and stay on at E! if they’re not willing to pay me the same as him?"

More than two months after the incident, Lawrence still hasn't forgotten about Sadler's treatment.

"They aren’t bringing another co-star up,” she told Stern, noticing E!'s hesitancy to embrace another female host.

She continued, “They keep cycling these women and I am going, 'Is that so you don’t have to pay another woman equally to Jason [Kennedy]? Is this just a way to still maintain that you are not paying women equally?'"

Lawrence let slip in February that she's executive producing a docuseries about the #MeToo movement alongside Sadler.

Photo by AFP/Getty Images.

Lawrence laid in to her aversion to E! after noting she may turn down an Oscars red carpet interview with the network's Ryan Seacrest, who's fending off allegations that he sexually assaulted a former E! stylist. She isn't too fond of the network's "Fashion Police," either, claiming "There was a time [the show's panelists] were just mean about people’s bodies."

“There is a lot to think about with E!" Lawrence mulled over.

The Oscar-winning actress has been an outspoken critic of Hollywood's gender pay gap for years.

She first made waves on the issue in 2015, penning an essay in Lenny newsletter, "Why Do I Make Less Than My Male Co-Stars?"

"I didn't want to seem 'difficult' or 'spoiled,'" Lawrence wrote of deciding against negotiating higher pay for her work on "American Hustle." Society expected her to prioritize her own likability — something that doesn't happen as much with men — the essay suggested. "At the time, that seemed like a fine idea, until I saw the payroll on the internet and realized every man I was working with definitely didn't worry about being 'difficult' or 'spoiled.'"

"I'm over trying to find the 'adorable' way to state my opinion and still be likable!" Lawrence concluded in her piece. "Fuck that."

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via @Todd_Spence / Twitter

Seven years ago, Bill Murray shared a powerful story about the importance of art. The revelation came during a discussion at the National Gallery in London for the release of 2014's "The Monuments Men." The film is about a troop of soldiers on a mission to recover art stolen by the Nazis.

After his first time performing on stage in Chicago, Murray was so upset with himself that he contemplated taking his own life.

"I wasn't very good, and I remember my first experience, I was so bad I just walked out — out onto the street and just started walking," he said.

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