In defense of protesters, a Baltimore Orioles baseball executive launched into an epic Twitter rant.

"This makes inconvenience at a ball game irrelevant in light of the needless suffering government is inflicting upon ordinary Americans."

Baltimore Orioles executive John P. Angelos tweeted in defense of protesters after WBAL sportscaster Brett Hollander took to Twitter to criticize the response to the death of Freddie Gray.

Like some others, Hollander showed frustration with what has been seen as violence on the part of the protesters in terms of damage to public and private property. (To the best of our knowledge, however, none of the protesters has snapped anyone's neck — so, there's that.)






At the conclusion of Saturday night's baseball game between the Baltimore Orioles and the Boston Red Sox, attendees were asked to remain inside the stadium until it was considered safe to exit.

Around this time, Orioles executive John P. Angelos responded to Hollander with an epic rant about pushing back on the government-sanctioned violence against minorities.

The raw tweets can be found on Angelos' Twitter profile, but for ease of reading, the text has been transcribed here (emphasis added).

Brett, speaking only for myself, I agree with your point that the principle of peaceful, non-violent protest and the observance of the rule of law is of utmost importance in any society. MLK, Gandhi, Mandela, and all great opposition leaders throughout history have always preached this proper precept. Further, it is critical that in any democracy, investigation must be completed and due process must be honored before any government or police members are judged responsible.

That said, my greater source of personal concern, outrage, and sympathy beyond this particular case is focused neither upon one night's property damage nor upon the acts' group but is focused rather upon the past four-decade period during which an American political elite have shipped middle class and working class jobs away from Baltimore and cities and towns around the US to 3rd world dictatorships like China and others plunged tens of millions of good hard-working Americans into economic devastation, and then followed that action around the nation by diminishing every American's civil rights protections in order to control an unfairly impoverished population living under an ever-declining standard of living and suffering at the butt end of an ever-more militarized and aggressive surveillance state.

The innocent working families of all backgrounds whose lives and dreams have been cut short by excessive violence, surveillance, and other abuses of the Bill of Rights by government pay the true price, an ultimate price, and one that far exceeds the importance of any kids' game played tonight, or ever, at Camden Yards. We need to keep in mind people are suffering and dying around the US and while we are thankful no one was injured at Camden Yards, there is a far bigger picture for poor Americans in Baltimore and everywhere who don't have jobs and are losing economic civil and legal rights and this makes inconvenience at a ball game irrelevant in light of the needless suffering government is inflicting upon ordinary Americans.



Sunday's game between the Orioles and Red Sox went off without a hitch, but team officials postponed Monday night's game because of the continued protests.

In addition, the week-long citywide 10 p.m. curfew put in place by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake may lead to additional scheduling challenges for the team, as the team has five night games scheduled over the next six days. The team hasn't yet said what they plan to do because they would likely finish at or around 10 p.m., violating curfew.

There's a need to prioritize the safety and well-being of its citizens over the playing of a game.

Just like Angelos said, "This makes an inconvenience at a ball game irrelevant in light of the needless suffering government is inflicting upon ordinary Americans."

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