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This story was originally published in May 2015 but was updated on May 20, 2016.

This is Don Moir, and in 2015, he was part of something pretty extraordinary.


All images and GIFs from Not Impossible/YouTube.

We'll talk more about that in a second, but first you should know a couple of things.

According to Not Impossible Labs, 26 years ago, Don got married to the love of his life, Lorraine.

Side by side, they worked on their family business.


Their business was a family farm, and getting things done required lots of communication.

They had three kids, a house, and lots of great memories as a family.

In 1995, Don was diagnosed with ALS and, four years later, was fitted with a ventilator. He hasn't spoken since.

Lorraine was devastated because she lost the ability to communicate with her husband and best friend.

But she refused to give up hope.

At first, Lorraine created a letterboard for Don.

She would hold up the board so that Don could form words by looking at a series of letters.

It was a huge step.

The problem was, even with the letterboard, it still took Don a really, really long time to finish even one sentence. He still had trouble expressing basic thoughts and emotions that most other people take for granted.

He could still barely tell his family he loved them.

Enter Mick Ebeling.


He's the founder of Not Impossible Labs, a company that invents things for people with disabilities to make their lives a little easier. He was determined to give Don his voice back.

Mick worked with Don to invent a device that allowed him to communicate independently.

When Don started using the technology, he was suddenly able to communicate faster and more clearly than he had been able to in 15 years — up to two-and-a-half words a minute.

And communicate he did.

Starting with a love letter to his wife.

"My Dear Lorraine, I can't imagine life without you. You have made the last 25 years fly by, and the last 20 with ALS more bearable. I am looking forward to the next 25 years.
Love, Don."

There are many more people like Don, and Mick is helping to scale this technology for others to have the ability to communicate.

Not Impossible's achievements are already being recognized — "Don's Voice" won SXSW's Innovation in Connecting People award for 2016.

Please watch and share Don and Lorraine's story. And for more information, check out Not Impossible.

Joy

1991 blooper clip of Robin Williams and Elmo is a wholesome nugget of comedic genius

Robin Williams is still bringing smiles to faces after all these years.

Robin Williams and Elmo (Kevin Clash) bloopers.

The late Robin Williams could make picking out socks funny, so pairing him with the fuzzy red monster Elmo was bound to be pure wholesome gold. Honestly, how the puppeteer, Kevin Clash, didn’t completely break character and bust out laughing is a miracle. In this short outtake clip, you get to see Williams crack a few jokes in his signature style while Elmo tries desperately to keep it together.

Williams has been a household name since what seems like the beginning of time, and before his death in 2014, he would make frequent appearances on "Sesame Street." The late actor played so many roles that if you were ask 10 different people what their favorite was, you’d likely get 10 different answers. But for the kids who spent their childhoods watching PBS, they got to see him being silly with his favorite monsters and a giant yellow canary. At least I think Big Bird is a canary.

When he stopped by "Sesame Street" for the special “Big Bird's Birthday or Let Me Eat Cake” in 1991, he was there to show Elmo all of the wonderful things you could do with a stick. Williams turns the stick into a hockey stick and a baton before losing his composure and walking off camera. The entire time, Elmo looks enthralled … if puppets can look enthralled. He’s definitely paying attention before slumping over at the realization that Williams goofed a line. But the actor comes back to continue the scene before Elmo slinks down inside his box after getting Williams’ name wrong, which causes his human co-star to take his stick and leave.

The little blooper reel is so cute and pure that it makes you feel good for a few minutes. For an additional boost of serotonin, check out this other (perfectly executed) clip about conflict that Williams did with the two-headed monster. He certainly had a way of engaging his audience, so it makes sense that even after all of these years, he's still greatly missed.

Noe Hernandez and Maria Carrillo, the owners of Noel Barber Shop in Anaheim, California.

Jordyn Poulter was the youngest member of the U.S. women’s volleyball team, which took home the gold medal at the Tokyo Olympics last year. She was named the best setter at the Tokyo games and has been a member of the team since 2018.

Unfortunately, according to a report from ABC 7 News, her gold medal was stolen from her car in a parking garage in Anaheim, California, on May 25.

It was taken along with her passport, which she kept in her glove compartment. While storing a gold medal in your car probably isn’t the best idea, she did it to keep it by her side while fulfilling the hectic schedule of an Olympian.

"We live this crazy life of living so many different places. So many of us play overseas, then go home, then come out here and train,” Poulter said, according to ABC 7. "So I keep the medal on me (to show) friends and family I haven't seen in a while, or just people in the community who want to see the medal. Everyone feels connected to it when they meet an Olympian, and it's such a cool thing to share with people."

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Memories of childhood get lodged in the brain, emerging when you least expect.

There are certain pleasurable sights, smells, sounds and tastes that fade into the rear-view mirror as we grow from being children to adults. But on a rare occasion, we’ll come across them again and it's like a portion of our brain that’s been hidden for years expresses itself, creating a huge jolt of joy.

It’s wonderful to experience this type of nostalgia but it often leaves a bittersweet feeling because we know there are countless more sensations that may never come into our consciousness again.

Nostalgia is fleeting and that's a good thing because it’s best not to live in the past. But it does remind us that the wonderful feeling of freedom, creativity and fun from our childhood can still be experienced as we age.

A Reddit user by the name of agentMICHAELscarnTLM posed a question to the online forum that dredged up countless memories and experiences that many had long forgotten. He asked a simple question, “What’s something you can bring up right now to unlock some childhood nostalgia for the rest of us?”

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