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An explanation of the GameStop stock story for people who are wondering what it's all about

I'm not proud to admit this, but I know virtually nothing about the stock market. I mean, I know what it is and on a very, very basic level know how it works. Kinda. Maybe. I don't even know.

That's a problem when some huge news about the stock market comes along. While clearly a big deal, this news about GameStop stock skyrocketing because a bunch of Reddit users did something and a bunch of billionaire hedge funders got screwed over by it has been a little lost of me.

I'm sure I'm not alone in this. In fact, I know I'm not, based on the virality of this "normal person" explainer video shared on Twitter. Prior to two days ago, this is pretty much exactly how I would have explained what's going on:

There are a whole lot of us who don't understand the stock market and usually don't care that we don't understand it. Then a big, important David and Goliath story like this comes along, making it clear we should know more than we do.


Part of the problem is that there's so much "inside baseball" terminology to wade through when you dive in. I graduated from college with honors, for the love, but every time I try to read a news story about this GameStop thing, I have to stop every other sentence to look up words that financial writers assume we all know and understand. (I still don't even get what a hedge fund is, much less how short selling would affect one. And WTF is a "position" in a stock market context? Zero idea.)

What I need is someone to translate all that finance-speak into layman's terms, super simply, like I'm in kindergarten. I don't need all the nitty-gritty details of exactly how it all works, I just need enough so that I "get it." I read a bunch of posts and explainer articles, some more helpful than others, but nothing has synopsized it all quite as concisely and clearly as this 3-minute video shared by Now This. Enjoy:

Okay, so I still don't know exactly what a position is, but I get the gist.

Not only does this story explain a bit about how the game of Wall Street is played, but it also helps explain how the filthy rich have managed to get filthy richer during a pandemic when millions are struggling. On one level, businesses struggling is actually good for investors as they can take advantage of the falling prices.

Pretty gross to purposefully profit off of pandemic fallout, if you ask me. But what do I know? Like I said, not much. I will say, this whole thing is a good incentive to learn more about how that part of the U.S. economic system works. Knowing that it's actually not untouchable, that it's not just elite economic geniuses who know what they're doing, that there are ways for the average person to influence wealth distribution is intriguing to say the least. And anything that makes predatory billionaires shake in their boots is good fun.

We could all benefit from greater financial literacy, especially when it's clear that the rules of the game are in flux. We'll see how it all shakes out in the end, but it seems that these Redditors may prove that David has a chance against Goliath after all.

10/10. The Mayyas dance.

We can almost always expect to see amazing acts and rare skills on “America’s Got Talent.” But sometimes, we get even more than that.

The Mayyas, a Lebanese women’s dance troupe whose name means “proud walk of a lioness,” delivered a performance so mesmerizing that judge Simon Cowell called it the “best dance act” the show has ever seen, winning them an almost instant golden buzzer.

Perhaps this victory comes as no surprise, considering that the Mayyas had previously won “Arab’s Got Talent” in 2019 and competed on “Britain’s Got Talent: The Champions.” But truly, it’s what motivates them to take to the stage that’s remarkable.

“Lebanon is a very beautiful country, but we live a daily struggle," one of the dancers said to the judges just moments before their audition. Another explained, “being a dancer as a female Arab is not fully supported yet.”

Nadim Cherfan, the team’s choreographer, added that “Lebanon is not considered a place where you can build a career out of dancing, so it’s really hard, and harder for women.”

Still, Cherfan shared that it was a previous “AGT” star who inspired the Mayyas to defy the odds and audition anyway. Nightbirde, a breakout singer who also earned a golden buzzer before tragically passing away in February 2021 due to cancer, had told the audience, “You can't wait until life isn't hard anymore before you decide to be happy.” The dance team took the advice to heart.

For the Mayyas, coming onto the “AGT” stage became more than an audition opportunity. Getting emotional, one of the dancers declared that it was “our only chance to prove to the world what Arab women can do, the art we can create, the fights we fight.”

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5 easy ways to practice self care

Because taking care of yourself should never feel like a chore

Sometimes in the hustle and bustle of day-to-day life we forget the important things: like taking care of ourselves. While binge watching your favorite show and ordering take out can be just the treat-yourself-thing you need, your body might not always feel the same. So we’re bringing you 5 easy ways to practice self-care that both you and your body will thank us for.

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via Pexels

Three people engaged in conversation at a party.

There are some people who live under the illusion that everything they say is deeply interesting and have no problem wasting your time by rambling on and on without a sign of stopping. They’re the relative, neighbor or co-worker who can’t take a hint that the conversation is over.

Of all these people, the co-worker who can’t stop talking may be the most challenging because you see them every day in a professional setting that requires politeness.

There are many reasons that some people talk excessively. Therapist F. Diane Barth writes in Psychology Today that some people talk excessively because they don’t have the ability to process complex auditory signals, so they ramble on without recognizing the subtle cues others are sending.

It may also be a case of someone who thinks they’re the most interesting person in the conversation.

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