Fashion has always helped move the needle forward. So we created our own store.

"Power to the People." "United We Shall Overcome." "Make Love Not War." Why do these phrases still resonate 50 years later?

It's partly because they became power slogans that united passionate activists around the country standing up for what they believed in.

It's also partly because they appeared on millions of posters, buttons, and shirts sported by passionate protesters during the late 1960s.


At that time, polarizing government actions and unaddressed injustices had led to a starkly divided nation that left many people feeling voiceless and powerless. But instead of sitting back, they took to the streets, protesting these injustices as often as they could. They traveled across the country to confront President Richard Nixon in Washington, D.C. They made considerable efforts to encourage social change in their own backyards.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Albert R. Simpson/Department of Defense/Wikimedia Commons.

Sound familiar?

Even when they weren't actively demonstrating, it became common practice for activists to wear their missions proudly, like bold badges of support.

Not only did this help encourage a unified front, it likely stirred up dialogue between people with differing opinions who might not otherwise engage. Those conversations may not have always been constructive, but the mere possibility of them was a step in the right direction.

These emblems helped keep important issues on people's minds, reminding everyone that there's still more work to be done.

Photo via the New York State Museum.

Reflections of the 1960s activism culture are clearly visible in today's youth.

A prime example is the thousands of students who walked out of their schools on April 20, 2018, in protest of the lack of harsher gun laws. Many of them wore orange in solidarity.

It's not surprising that activism is on the rise given the similarly tumultuous time in which we find ourselves. It's also oddly fitting considering it's the 50th anniversary of so many iconic student protests, including Kent State, Columbia University, and the Paris riots. Those young adults were also fighting for change against a government run by an older generation bent on upholding the status quo. The only difference is that today, protesters are armed with a much more powerful mouthpiece than their own voices: the internet.

Thanks to such a pervasive rallying device, protests are happening more often and on many different levels. From solidarity movements like #MeToo to donation-based demonstrations like those made to Planned Parenthood in Mike Pence's name, activism is evolving in inspiring ways. However, what's perhaps most exciting is how much activism is going on in real life despite the stereotype of internet slacktivism.

People are realizing that showing up for causes they believe in is still the most effective way to send a message. And wearing a unifying symbol helps strengthen their mission.

Consider the millions of pink pussy hats people wore to the Women's March that spanned the world on Feb. 21, 2017 — the day after Inauguration Day in the U.S.

Photo by Philip Roeder/Flickr.

Or the safety pin movement that sprung up in opposition to the rampant xenophobia of 2017.

👊🏻👊🏼👊🏽👊🏾👊🏿 #safe

A post shared by Olivia Wilde (@oliviawilde) on

These emblems helped protesters see just how many people are standing behind them, even if they're not all in the same place at the same time. They also kept the movement on everyone's minds.

Clearly, fashion can play a pivotal role in moving the needle forward. That's why we at Upworthy and GOOD have created our very own collection of wearable items for our audience to wear proudly in 2018.

We're calling it PSA Supply Co., and it's designed to help people like you share positive, solution-oriented messaging about the future of our country and our world. Gone are the days of sitting on the sidelines.

Our "Human, Kind." shirt. Photo via PSA.

Both publications are platforms where people go already to be inspired by artists, big thinkers, activists, and impactful nonprofits; this lifestyle-brand arm will be an extension of that. Our hope is that it will also inspire people to connect with others and spark necessary conversations about change.

But the mission here isn't just to spread inspiring messages. From production to sale, these goods are giving back in a big way.

PSA makes all its merchandise in partnership with Social Imprints — a manufacturing company that employs at-risk adults — including those who've been formerly incarcerated, veterans, and recovering addicts — in order to give them a second shot at a successful life.

Photo via PSA.

And 10% of every sale of this round will go to the Center for Community Change Action — a nonprofit that strives to empower low-income people to create change in their communities and across the country. Many of these individuals have been severely affected by the new policies of our current administration. That's why this organization is committed to getting their voices heard by people who can do something about it.

This week, we officially launch our first suite of products ranging from a simple "Be Nice It’s Cool" to a plain white T-shirt featuring any senator's phone number you want.  

Our first collection currently features four designs that display impactful, timelessly significant messages.

Photos via PSA.

But our favorite? "Nov. 6." This election (and every election) is a big one, so wear this shirt proud and remind your friends and family that their vote counts.

Photo via PSA.

If you're not a T-shirt fan, there are also buttons and tote bags available that carry bold messages like "Fear less" and "Give a damn!"

It may seem silly to think that a phrase on a T-shirt or button could make a difference in the face of so much discord. But judging by history, a little message can resonate for decades if it's powerful enough.

Inciting change is a long and arduous process, but the more people who stand behind these movements, the quicker they'll move forward.

It starts with identifying what your values are and how you can help make them universal. So, what change do you want to be?

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Judy Vaughan has spent most of her life helping other women, first as the director of House of Ruth, a safe haven for homeless families in East Los Angeles, and later as the Project Coordinator for Women for Guatemala, a solidarity organization committed to raising awareness about human rights abuses.

But in 1996, she decided to take things a step further. A house became available in the mid-Wilshire area of Los Angeles and she was offered the opportunity to use it to help other women and children. So, in partnership with a group of 13 people who she knew from her years of activism, she decided to make it a transitional residence program for homeless women and their children. They called the program Alexandria House.

"I had learned from House of Ruth that families who are homeless are often isolated from the surrounding community," Judy says. "So we decided that as part of our mission, we would also be a neighborhood center and offer a number of resources and programs, including an after-school program and ESL classes."

She also decided that, unlike many other shelters in Los Angeles, she would accept mothers with their teenage boys.

"There are very few in Los Angeles [that do] due to what are considered liability issues," Judy explains. "Given the fact that there are (conservatively) 56,000 homeless people and only about 11,000 shelter beds on any one night, agencies can be selective on who they take."

Their Board of Directors had already determined that they should take families that would have difficulties finding a place. Some of these challenges include families with more than two children, immigrant families without legal documents, moms who are pregnant with other small children, families with a member who has a disability [and] families with service dogs.

"Being separated from your son or sons, especially in the early teen years, just adds to the stress that moms who are unhoused are already experiencing," Judy says.

"We were determined to offer women with teenage boys another choice."

Courtesy of Judy Vaughan

Alexandria House also doesn't kick boys out when they turn 18. For example, Judy says they currently have a mom with two daughters (21 and 2) and a son who just turned 18. The family had struggled to find a shelter that would take them all together, and once they found Alexandria House, they worried the boy would be kicked out on his 18th birthday. But, says Judy, "we were not going to ask him to leave because of his age."

Homelessness is a big issue in Los Angeles. "[It] is considered the homeless capital of the United States," Judy says. "The numbers have not changed significantly since 1984 when I was working at the House of Ruth." The COVID-19 pandemic has only compounded the problem. According to Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA), over 66,000 people in the greater Los Angeles area were experiencing homelessness in 2020, representing a rise of 12.7% compared with the year before.

Each woman who comes to Alexandria House has her own unique story, but some common reasons for ending up homeless include fleeing from a domestic violence or human trafficking situation, aging out of foster care and having no place to go, being priced out of an apartment, losing a job, or experiencing a family emergency with no 'cushion' to pay the rent.

"Homelessness is not a definition; it is a situation that a person finds themselves in, and in fact, it can happen to almost anyone. There are many practices and policies that make it almost impossible to break out of poverty and move out of homelessness."

And that's why Alexandria House exists: to help them move out of it. How long that takes depends on the woman, but according to Judy, families stay an average of 10 months. During that time, the women meet with support staff to identify needs and goals and put a plan of action in place.

A number of services are provided, including free childcare, programs and mentoring for school-age children, free mental health counseling, financial literacy classes and a savings program. They have also started Step Up Sisterhood LA, an entrepreneurial program to support women's dreams of starting their own businesses. "We serve as a support system for as long as a family would like," Judy says, even after they have moved on.

And so far, the program is a resounding success.

92 percent of the 200 families who stayed at Alexandria House have found financial stability and permanent housing — not becoming homeless again.

Since founding Alexandria House 25 years ago, Judy has never lost sight of her mission to join with others and create a vision of a more just society and community. That is why she is one of Tory Burch's Empowered Women this year — and the donation she receives as a nominee will go to Alexandria House and will help grow the new Start-up Sisterhood LA program.

"Alexandria House is such an important part of my life," says Judy. "It has been amazing to watch the children grow up and the moms recreate their lives for themselves and for their families. I have witnessed resiliency, courage, and heroic acts of generosity."

via Wikimedia Commons and Goalsetter

America's ethnic wealth gap is a multi-faceted problem that would take dramatic action, on multiple fronts, to overcome. One of the ways to help communities improve their economic well-being is through financial literacy.

Investopedia says there are five primary sources of financial education—families, high school, college, employers, and the military — and that education and household income are two of the biggest factors in predicting whether someone has a high level of financial literacy.

New Orleans Saints safety, two-time Super Bowl Champion, and social justice activist Malcolm Jenkins and The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation hope to help bridge the wealth gap by teaching students about investing at a young age.

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2020 was difficult (to say the least). The year was full of life changes, losses, and lessons as we learned to navigate the "new normal." You may have questions about what the changes and challenges of 2020 mean for your taxes. That's where TurboTax Live comes in, making it easy to connect with real tax experts to help with your taxes – or even do them for you, start to finish.

Not only has TurboTax Live helped millions of people get their taxes done right, but this year they've also celebrated people who uplifted their communities during a difficult time by surprising them with "little lifts" to help out even more.

Here are a few of their stories:


Julz, hairdresser and salon owner

"As a hairdresser and salon owner, 2020 was extremely challenging," says Julz. "Being a hairdresser has historically been a recession-proof industry, but we've never faced global shut down due to health risk, or pandemic, not in my lifetime. And for the first time, hairdressers didn't have job security."

Julz had to shut down her salon and go on unemployment benefits for the first time. She also had to figure out how she was going to support herself, her staff and her business during this difficult time. But many other beauty industry professionals didn't have access to the resources they needed, so Julz decided to help.

"My business partner and I began teaching basic financial literacy to other beauty industry professionals," she says. "Transitioning our business from behind the chair to an online academy was a challenge we tackled head-on so that we could move hairdressers into this new space of education, and create a more accessible curriculum to better serve our industry.

Julz connected with a TurboTax Live expert who helped her understand how unemployment affected her taxes and gave her guidance on filing quarterly estimated taxes for her small business. "I was terrified to sit at a computer and tackle this mess of receipts," Julz says, so "it was great to have some virtual handholding to walk me through each question."

In addition to giving Julz the personalized tax advice she needed, TurboTax Live surprised her with a "little lift" that empowered her to help even more beauty professionals. "When my tax expert Diana surprised me with a little lift, I was moved to tears," says Julz. "With that little lift, I was able to establish a scholarship fund to help get other hairdressers the education they deserve."


Alana, new mom

Alana welcomed her first child in 2020. "I think my biggest challenge was figuring out how to be a mom, with no guidance," she says. "My original plan was to have my mom by my side, teaching me the ropes, but because of COVID, she wasn't able to come out here."

She was also without a job for most of 2020 and struggled to find something new.

So, Alana took it as a sign: she decided to launch her own business so she could support her new baby, and that's exactly what she did. She started a feel-good company that specializes in creating affirmation card decks — and she's currently in the process of starting a second, video-editing business.

TurboTax Live answered Alana's questions about her taxes and gave her some much-needed advice as she prepared to launch her businesses. Thanks to their "little lift," they provided her with a little emotional support too.

"I got my mom a plane ticket to finally [have her] meet [my daughter] for her first birthday," Alana says. "I was also able to get a new computer," which helped her invest in her new business and work on her video editing skills. "It's helped my family and me so much," she says.


Michael, science teacher

When schools shut down across the country last year, Michael had to learn how to adapt to a virtual classroom.

"As a teacher, I had to completely revamp everything," he says, so that he could keep his students engaged while teaching online. "At the beginning, it was a nightmare because I had no idea. I had to go from A-Z within a couple of weeks."

Michael's TurboTax Live expert answered his questions about how working from home affected his taxes and helped him uncover surprising tax deductions. To top it all off, his expert surprised him with brand new science equipment and supplies, which allowed him to create an entire line of classes on YouTube, TikTok, Instagram, and Facebook. "Now I can truly potentially reach millions of children with my lessons," he says. "I would never have taken that leap if not for the little lift from TurboTax Live."



Ricky, motivational youth speaker

As a motivational speaker, Ricky was used to doing his job in person, but, he says, "when COVID-19 hit, it altered my ability to travel and visit schools in person [because] schools moved to fully virtual or hybrid models."

He knew he had to pivot — so he began offering small virtual group workshops for student leadership groups at middle and high schools.

"This allowed me to work with student leaders to plan how they would continue making a positive impact on their school community," he says. He wasn't sure how being remote would affect his taxes, but TurboTax Live Self-Employed gave him the advice and answers that he needed to keep more money in his pocket at tax time — and the little lift he received from them has helped him serve even more students.

"[It] has been a major blessing," he says "There will be multiple schools and student groups from across the country that I can hold leadership workshops with to empower them with the tools to be inspirational leaders in their school, community, and world."

Plus, he says, it was great knowing he had an expert to help him figure out how being remote affected his taxes. "I felt confident and assured in the process of filing my taxes knowing I had an expert working with me, says Ricky. "There were things my expert knew that I would not have considered when filing on my own."

Filing your taxes doesn't have to be intimidating, especially after a year like 2020. TurboTax Live experts can give you the "little lift" you need to get your taxes done. File with the help of an expert or let an expert file for you! Go to TurboTax Live to get started.