Fashion has always helped move the needle forward. So we created our own store.

"Power to the People." "United We Shall Overcome." "Make Love Not War." Why do these phrases still resonate 50 years later?

It's partly because they became power slogans that united passionate activists around the country standing up for what they believed in.

It's also partly because they appeared on millions of posters, buttons, and shirts sported by passionate protesters during the late 1960s.


At that time, polarizing government actions and unaddressed injustices had led to a starkly divided nation that left many people feeling voiceless and powerless. But instead of sitting back, they took to the streets, protesting these injustices as often as they could. They traveled across the country to confront President Richard Nixon in Washington, D.C. They made considerable efforts to encourage social change in their own backyards.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Albert R. Simpson/Department of Defense/Wikimedia Commons.

Sound familiar?

Even when they weren't actively demonstrating, it became common practice for activists to wear their missions proudly, like bold badges of support.

Not only did this help encourage a unified front, it likely stirred up dialogue between people with differing opinions who might not otherwise engage. Those conversations may not have always been constructive, but the mere possibility of them was a step in the right direction.

These emblems helped keep important issues on people's minds, reminding everyone that there's still more work to be done.

Photo via the New York State Museum.

Reflections of the 1960s activism culture are clearly visible in today's youth.

A prime example is the thousands of students who walked out of their schools on April 20, 2018, in protest of the lack of harsher gun laws. Many of them wore orange in solidarity.

It's not surprising that activism is on the rise given the similarly tumultuous time in which we find ourselves. It's also oddly fitting considering it's the 50th anniversary of so many iconic student protests, including Kent State, Columbia University, and the Paris riots. Those young adults were also fighting for change against a government run by an older generation bent on upholding the status quo. The only difference is that today, protesters are armed with a much more powerful mouthpiece than their own voices: the internet.

Thanks to such a pervasive rallying device, protests are happening more often and on many different levels. From solidarity movements like #MeToo to donation-based demonstrations like those made to Planned Parenthood in Mike Pence's name, activism is evolving in inspiring ways. However, what's perhaps most exciting is how much activism is going on in real life despite the stereotype of internet slacktivism.

People are realizing that showing up for causes they believe in is still the most effective way to send a message. And wearing a unifying symbol helps strengthen their mission.

Consider the millions of pink pussy hats people wore to the Women's March that spanned the world on Feb. 21, 2017 — the day after Inauguration Day in the U.S.

Photo by Philip Roeder/Flickr.

Or the safety pin movement that sprung up in opposition to the rampant xenophobia of 2017.

These emblems helped protesters see just how many people are standing behind them, even if they're not all in the same place at the same time. They also kept the movement on everyone's minds.

Clearly, fashion can play a pivotal role in moving the needle forward. That's why we at Upworthy and GOOD have created our very own collection of wearable items for our audience to wear proudly in 2018.

We're calling it PSA Supply Co., and it's designed to help people like you share positive, solution-oriented messaging about the future of our country and our world. Gone are the days of sitting on the sidelines.

Our "Human, Kind." shirt. Photo via PSA.

Both publications are platforms where people go already to be inspired by artists, big thinkers, activists, and impactful nonprofits; this lifestyle-brand arm will be an extension of that. Our hope is that it will also inspire people to connect with others and spark necessary conversations about change.

But the mission here isn't just to spread inspiring messages. From production to sale, these goods are giving back in a big way.

PSA makes all its merchandise in partnership with Social Imprints — a manufacturing company that employs at-risk adults — including those who've been formerly incarcerated, veterans, and recovering addicts — in order to give them a second shot at a successful life.

Photo via PSA.

And 10% of every sale of this round will go to the Center for Community Change Action — a nonprofit that strives to empower low-income people to create change in their communities and across the country. Many of these individuals have been severely affected by the new policies of our current administration. That's why this organization is committed to getting their voices heard by people who can do something about it.

This week, we officially launch our first suite of products ranging from a simple "Be Nice It’s Cool" to a plain white T-shirt featuring any senator's phone number you want.  

Our first collection currently features four designs that display impactful, timelessly significant messages.

Photos via PSA.

But our favorite? "Nov. 6." This election (and every election) is a big one, so wear this shirt proud and remind your friends and family that their vote counts.

Photo via PSA.

If you're not a T-shirt fan, there are also buttons and tote bags available that carry bold messages like "Fear less" and "Give a damn!"

It may seem silly to think that a phrase on a T-shirt or button could make a difference in the face of so much discord. But judging by history, a little message can resonate for decades if it's powerful enough.

Inciting change is a long and arduous process, but the more people who stand behind these movements, the quicker they'll move forward.

It starts with identifying what your values are and how you can help make them universal. So, what change do you want to be?

Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
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Glenda moved to Houston from Ohio just before the pandemic hit. She didn't know that COVID-19-related delays would make it difficult to get her Texas driver's license and apply for unemployment benefits. She quickly found herself in an impossible situation — stranded in a strange place without money for food, gas, or a job to provide what she needed.

Alone, hungry, and scared, Glenda dialed 2-1-1 for help. The person on the other end of the line directed her to the Houston-based nonprofit Bread of Life, founded by St. John's United Methodist pastors Rudy and Juanita Rasmus.

For nearly 30 years, Bread of Life has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention, eliminating food insecurity, providing permanent housing to formerly homeless individuals and disaster relief.

Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

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Yesterday I was perusing comments on an Upworthy article about Joe Biden comforting the son of a Parkland shooting victim and immediately had flashbacks to the lead-up of the 2016 election. In describing former vice President Biden, some commenters were using the words "criminal," "corrupt," and "pedophile—exactly the same words people used to describe Hillary Clinton in 2016.

I remember being baffled so many people were so convinced of Clinton's evil schemes that they genuinely saw the documented serial liar and cheat that she was running against as the lesser of two evils. I mean, sure, if you believe that a career politician had spent years being paid off by powerful people and was trafficking children to suck their blood in her free time, just about anything looks like a better alternative.

But none of that was true.

It's been four years and Hillary Clinton has been found guilty of exactly none of the criminal activity she was being accused of. Trump spent every campaign rally leading chants of "Lock her up!" under the guise that she was going to go to jail after the election. He's been president for nearly four years now, and where is Clinton? Not in jail—she's comfy at home, occasionally trolling Trump on Twitter and doing podcasts.

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Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
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Glenda moved to Houston from Ohio just before the pandemic hit. She didn't know that COVID-19-related delays would make it difficult to get her Texas driver's license and apply for unemployment benefits. She quickly found herself in an impossible situation — stranded in a strange place without money for food, gas, or a job to provide what she needed.

Alone, hungry, and scared, Glenda dialed 2-1-1 for help. The person on the other end of the line directed her to the Houston-based nonprofit Bread of Life, founded by St. John's United Methodist pastors Rudy and Juanita Rasmus.

For nearly 30 years, Bread of Life has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention, eliminating food insecurity, providing permanent housing to formerly homeless individuals and disaster relief.

Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

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Racist jokes are one of the more frustrating manifestations of racism. Jokes in general are meant to be a shared experience, a connection over a mutual sense of humor, a rush of feel-good chemicals that bond us to those around us through laughter.

So when you mix jokes with racism, the result is that racism becomes something light and fun, as opposed to the horrendous bane that it really is.

The harm done with racist humor isn't just the emotional hurt they can cause. When a group of white people shares jokes at the expense of a marginalized or oppressed racial group, the power of white supremacy is actually reinforced—not only because of the "punching down" nature of such humor, but because of the group dynamics that work in favor of maintaining the status quo.

British author and motivational speaker Paul Scanlon shared a story about interrupting a racist joke at a table of white people at an event in the U.S, and the lessons he drew from it illustrate this idea beautifully. Watch:

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With the election quickly approaching, the importance of voting and sending in your ballot on time is essential. But there is another way you can vote everyday - by being intentional with each dollar you spend. Support companies and products that uphold your values and help create a more sustainable world. An easy move is swapping out everyday items that are often thrown away after one use or improperly disposed of.

Package Free Shop has created products to help fight climate change one cotton swab at a time! Founded by Lauren Singer, otherwise known as, "the girl with the jar" (she initially went viral for fitting 8 years of all of the waste she's created in one mason jar). Package Free is an ecosystem of brands on a mission to make the world less trashy.

Here are eight of our favorite everyday swaps:

1. Friendsheep Dryer Balls - Replace traditional dryer sheets with these dryer balls that are made without chemicals and conserve energy. Not only do these also reduce dry time by 20% but they're so cute and come in an assortment of patterns!

Package Free Shop

2. Last Swab - Replacement for single use plastic cotton swabs. Nearly 25.5 billion single use swabs are produced and discarded every year in the U.S., but not this one. It lasts up to 1,000 uses as it's able to be cleaned with soap and water. It also comes in a biodegradable, corn based case so you can use it on the go!

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