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Family-owned Fresh Cravings 'Salsabrates the Good' and supports youth changemakers
Courtesy of Fresh Cravings

Fresh Cravings Salsa has donated $250,000 to 50 grassroots non-profits with a focus on youth-led initiatives.

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There's no question that we live in challenging times. But along with challenges come opportunities for change—and for changemakers to rise up.

When the world feels dark, we naturally crave the light. We look for torches of goodness, people who create and shed light on positive change in their communities and in society, as a whole. Sometimes we find these wonderful humans in the most unlikely of places—for instance, in the "Salsabrations" of a beloved snacking brand known for chilled salsas and hummus dips.

Family-owned Fresh Cravings says that its motto, "Crave Goodness," is about inspiring people to seek the best for themselves, their friends and family and their communities. It’s not just lip service; the company puts its money where its mouth is, giving back to the communities it serves. In 2021, Fresh Cravings launched a national giveback campaign to "Salsabrate™ The Good" by donating $5,000 a week—$250,000 total—to 50 grassroots, non-profit organizations with an emphasis on youth change-makers. And it's continuing its commitment to amplify and support the good in 2022.


Upworthy is thrilled to partner with Fresh Cravings in sharing these youth-led initiatives and celebrating the unsung heroes who are being lifted up in this campaign. Check out these young folks and the awesome things they're doing for their communities:

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Maddie Bozik was 10 years old when she noticed that many kids in her school didn't have access to winter clothes. She lives in northern Illinois, which is known for harsh, cold winters. So she started a winter clothing drive in her neighborhood, which morphed into Maddie's Mitten March, a nonprofit that collects, cleans and distributes winter clothing for those in need. The organization utilizes two busses to collect and distribute the items, and Maddie says there's no plan to stop. "We'll just continue providing winter clothing to anyone who needs it," she says.

To learn more about the Maddie's Mitten March or to support Maddie's efforts, please visit: https://www.mittenmobile.com.

There are amazing initiatives all around us that we may not see that deserve to be recognized. Supporting those who are already enacting positive change in their communities—especially young people who represent the future of humanity—is one of the best ways companies and individuals can make an impact on our world.

To learn more about the other organizations Fresh Cravings is lifting up and to be part of this ongoing festival of compassion and charity, join the Salsabration and sign up for the Fresh Cravings newsletter. We can all make our world a better place by amplifying goodness and taking inspiration from the beacons of light in our communities.

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