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Photo by Jacopo Maia on Unsplash

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When I was a kid, I loved picking blackberries. I spent hours in the scalding hot sun pulling the fattest ones off the bushes and collecting them in a bucket, careful to avoid the thorns.

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Harvard negotiator teaches you how to argue.

Conflict is something that most people don't like. It can easily escalate into an argument, tempers can get flared and feelings hurt. But it doesn't have to be that way. Dan Shapiro, a Harvard negotiator, demonstrates how to argue effectively in a new insightful four-minute video.

The video covers three keys to an effective argument that can leave the other party feeling heard, validated and understood. This may all sound like some sort of magic trick, but the man has got some solid points, especially as it seems like people's ears stop working when someone disagrees with them.

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They've blinded us with science.

Stock photos of any job are usually delightful cringey. Sure, sometimes they sort of get the essence of a job, but a lot of the time the interpretation is downright cartoonish. One glance and it becomes abundantly clear that for some careers, we have no freakin’ clue what it is that people do.

Dr. Kit Chapman, an award-winning science journalist and academic at Falmouth University in the U.K., recently held an impromptu contest on Twitter where viewers could vote on which photos were the best of the worst when it came to jobs in scientific fields.

According to Chapman’s entries, a day in the life of a scientist includes poking syringes into chickens, wearing a lab coat (unless you’re a “sexy” scientist, then you wear lingerie) and holding vials of colored liquid. Lots and lots of vials.

Of course, where each image is 100% inaccurate, they are 100% giggle inducing. Take a look below at some of the contenders.

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A rescue helicopter flying high above the wilderness.

A woman was riding Colorado’s Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Train on Monday, October 10, when she noticed a distressed person near a riverbed waving frantically to the train.

The Durango Herald noted that it was incredible the woman was spotted because she “could only be seen from a very limited and particular angle.”

The Office of Emergency Management, San Juan County Colorado said in a Facebook post that after the passenger noticed the woman she notified train staff who initiated an emergency response. The staff notified Delton Henry who was following behind the train in the inspection motor car.

Henry pulled up to where the woman was last seen, called to her across the riverbed and learned she had a broken leg and couldn’t move. A superintendent for the train called 911 to get help from the San Juan County Search and Rescue.

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