All dads should read what Channing Tatum wrote about his daughter and sex.

Cosmopolitan magazine recently gave "Magic Mike" star Channing Tatum an open space to write whatever he wanted.

Yes, Cosmo of "67,349 mind-blowing sex tips" fame.

It was fitting that Tatum decided to provide some "sex tips" of his own — though they weren't what you might expect.


Channing Tatum and wife Jenna. Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images

The actor says sitting down to write the column made him think about his 3-year-old daughter, Everly.

"I pictured her in her late teens or early 20s, hoping to explore and discover her sexuality and dreaming about finding true love," he wrote.

First Father's Day with my girls!

A post shared by Channing Tatum (@channingtatum) on

For any dad, the idea of his daughter one day dating (and having sex) stirs up a lot of emotions.

It's easy to let those emotions get the better of you, which is why so many fathers out there feel like it's their job to intimidate the people their daughters choose to go out with. It's the old "I'll just be here polishing my shotgun," routine.

But a new generation of dads, like Tatum, are trying to break the mold.

Happy birthday my angel!

A post shared by Channing Tatum (@channingtatum) on

"I tried to imagine the things I’d want her to read that would help her understand men and sex and partnership better, and at that moment, I realized a strange thing," Tatum wrote. "I don’t want her looking to the outside world for answers. My highest hope for her is just that she has the fearlessness to always be her authentic self, no matter what she thinks men want her to be."

And that includes whatever her own dad might think.

No doubt, the first time his daughter brings home a date will be a big test for Tatum.

He'll likely feel those protective urges, those ideas of what dads are "supposed" to do, swelling up inside of him. But the fact that, in only three short years, he's learned that his emotions about his daughter's sexuality and choices aren't what matter is extremely encouraging.

"That’s what I want for my daughter," he wrote. "To be expectation-less with her love and not allow preconceived standards to affect her, to ask herself what she wants and feel empowered enough to act on it."

The fact that a man with such influence is willing to share that message?

It's a great sign that we are, in fact, inching closer and closer to real equality.

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