A wedding photographer captured her parents' love in this incredible viral photo shoot.

Amber Robinson, a photographer from Raleigh, North Carolina, is used to capturing photos of young couples in love.

Much of her business comes from weddings and engagement shoots with couples bursting at the seams with new love. Recently, however, she took on an assignment that was... a bit different from her usual fare.

The photos she took were no less romantic or full of love. Unlike her usual clients, the stars of this photo shoot were her own parents.


Robinson's mom and dad — Marvin and Wanda Brewington — have been married for 47 years, and Robinson felt it was time the world heard their powerful love story.

She shared the glamorous photos on Instagram where they quickly went viral, racking up thousands of likes and comments.

All photos by Amber Robinson used with permission.

The lifelong connection the couple has shared practically jumps off the screen, and has people across the internet swooning.

The photos weren't just adorable. They held a powerful message about making love last far beyond a wedding day or engagement shoot.

"In this wonderful creative industry that I worked in, I focus so much on providing couple hours with a day of beautiful photography," she wrote in the emotional post. "To be honest, rarely do I stop to think about the day, weeks, months or years that follow a wedding day."

In her parents' 47 years together, they've endured cancer, raised children, been through dozens of ups and downs, and have shown their children how to live with the generosity of an open heart.

"They are the epitome of where I strive to be in my own marriage and a constant reminder that a wedding is only a day, but a marriage is forever," she wrote.

"If you are one of the millions in love, or maybe one of the millions of broken-hearted that need a visual reminder that love always endures, I would love for you to share this as a way of letting my mom and dad know, they are an inspiration to anyone who wants, believes, or is in love."

“I never dreamed of my wedding... only dreamed of a beautiful marriage.” In this wonderful creative industry that I worked in, I focus so much on providing couple hours with a day of beautiful photography. To be honest, rarely do I stop to think about the day, weeks, months or years that follow a wedding day. So today I share with you what those years after can look like when true love exists. These are my parents: married for 47 years, they have triumphed over cancer...twice. Have raised two successful daughters. They have been poor together and rich together. They have fed, sheltered, and advised countless lost souls. They love with out expectation and give freely, whatever it is they have to offer. I am SO proud to call them Mom and Dad. They are the epitome of where I strive to be in my own marriage and a constant reminder that a wedding is only a day, but a marriage is forever. If you are one of the millions in love, or maybe one of the millions of broken-hearted that need a visual reminder that love always endures, I would love for you to share this as a way of letting my mom and dad know, they are an inspiration to anyone who wants, believes, or is in love. . . . . . #imagesbyamberr #raleigh #wedding #photographer #raleighwedding #raleighphotographer #raleighweddingphotographer #anniversary #marriagegoals #marriage #blacklove #growoldtogether #growoldwithme #aarpphoto #silverfox #risingtidesociety #love #truelove #wokeweddingpros #defytheodds #southernnoirweddings #blackweddingphotographers #blackweddingphotographer #blackbride1998 #soulsreconnected #happilyeverafter #aftertheaisle #wedclique #bustld #whimsicallywed

A post shared by Images by Amber Robinson (@imagesbyamberr) on

There's a myth floating around out there that true love is dead, killed by divorce and casual hookups — but that couldn't be further from the truth.

People love to cite outdated divorce statistics, or "hook up culture," as a sign that younger generations don't take relationships seriously. But the data shows otherwise.

People are waiting longer and longer to get married, have more freedom to choose their partner, are feeling less pressure to settle down when they're not ready (or at all, if they don't want to!), and likely as a result of that, divorces are actually at a 40-year low.

"I guess people have been given a restored sense of hope through these images," Robinson writes in an email. "So much bad is happening in the world and to look at these pictures and image that a lasting love IS possible just brings hope, especially during this time of the year."

Lifelong monogamy isn't for everyone. But it's hard not to look at these photos and not get all warm and tingly.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.