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Meet Brian Sims, Democratic member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives.

Photo via Brian Sims/Facebook.

He's also the state's first openly gay lawmaker.

His pride and bravery have won him plenty of fans, but have also opened him up to a slew of hate speech and criticism.


So much so that Sims has gotten, well, pretty dang good at handling the trolls.

One man recently came to Sims' Facebook page to attack him, but got a little more than he bargained for.

After spewing some horrific insults at Sims via his Facebook page, the commenter (known only as David) got a response that had to have taken him off guard.

Sims called David's grandma and told on him.

Really.

Dear Bigots, posting your grandmother's telephone number all over the same page you use to post slurs on other people's pages is not going to end well for you. Brian

Posted by

Brian Sims on Wednesday, April 26, 2017

"David," Sims wrote in response. "... you shouldn't have posted your grandmother's telephone number on your Facebook page so many times. She and I just had a very disappointing chat about you."

And he was 100% serious.

Sims told Occupy Democrats he was hoping to get David himself on the phone when Grandma picked up. But she promised Sims that David would call him back.

He did, but not before David's grandmother, presumably, gave him an earful.

“She wasn’t kidding," Sims said. "I heard from him within two hours and while I can’t say we resolved anything, I can pretty much guarantee that Christmas at my home is going to be better than his this year.”

It goes to show: Just because you can say anything you want online doesn't mean you should.

Unfortunately though, this kind of hate speech isn't limited to anonymous internet trolls these days.

The world might be a better place if everyone stopped before they judged, harassed, attacked, or smeared another human being and thought: 'What would my grandma think?'

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Joy

10 things that made us smile this week

Here, have a round of joy. It's on us.

Alexas_Fotos/Canva

Upworthy's weekly roundup of delights.

When headlines and social media seem to be dominated by the negative, we all need reminders that the world is full of wonderfulness. Joy connects and inspires us and can be found everywhere—if we keep our eyes open and look for it. One of our goals at Upworthy is to make that search a little easier by telling stories that highlight the best of humanity and sharing the delights, large and small, that unite us.

Each week, we collect 10 things that made us smile and offer them to you to enjoy and share with others. We hope this week's list tickles your heart and brings a smile (or 10) to your face as well.

1. Tico the parrot is a master vocalist. Not even an exaggeration.

@ticoandtheman

On a dark desert hwy, cool wind in my hair…

We've shared some delightful parrots in these roundups before, and each one somehow seems to out-entertain the last. I did not see Tico's vocal skills coming, though. The intonation! The vibrato! Even my music major daughter was blown away by this singing bird.

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Family

A mom describes her tween son's brain. It's a must-read for all parents.

"Sometimes I just feel really angry and I don’t know why."

This story originally appeared on 1.05.19


It started with a simple, sincere question from a mother of an 11-year-old boy.

An anonymous mother posted a question to Quora, a website where people can ask questions and other people can answer them. This mother wrote:

How do I tell my wonderful 11 year old son, (in a way that won't tear him down), that the way he has started talking to me (disrespectfully) makes me not want to be around him (I've already told him the bad attitude is unacceptable)?

It's a familiar scenario for those of us who have raised kids into the teen years. Our sweet, snuggly little kids turn into moody middle schoolers seemingly overnight, and sometimes we're left reeling trying to figure out how to handle their sensitive-yet-insensitive selves.


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