A group of Instagram users tried to mommy-shame Jessica Simpson. Were they right?
Photo by Brian Ach / Getty Images

On March 19, Jessica Simpson and her husband, former San Francisco 49er Eric Johnson, welcomed their third child into the world, Birdie Mae Johnson.

A little over a month later, Simpson shared photos of her newborn baby in her Easter best and she probably wishes she hadn’t.

Both photos of Birdie Mae showed the newborn sleeping on her stomach, a big no-no according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Babies that sleep on their stomachs have an increased risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).


View this post on Instagram

Birdie Mae Johnson

A post shared by Jessica Simpson (@jessicasimpson) on

View this post on Instagram

💕 SISTERS 💕 #MAXIDREW #BIRDIEMAE

A post shared by Jessica Simpson (@jessicasimpson) on

A group of Instagram commenters were quick to point out that babies shouldn’t be sleeping on their stomachs.

via Instagram / Jessica Simpson

via Instagram / Jessica Simpson

via Instagram / Jessica Simpson

via Instagram / Jessica Simpson

The comments prompted Simpson’s mother, Tina, to explain that the baby was only posed in that position. “We stood over her and placed her in that position for a picture only!” Tina wrote. “Enjoy the preciousness! Happy Easter.”

It’s clear in the photo that the baby was being posed, so the negative comments feel more like a group of know-it-alls trying to virtue signal at a celebrity than people seriously interested in Birdie Mae’s health.

A recent poll found that this type of mommy-shaming online isn’t just directed at celebrities. A recent poll by C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital in Ann Arbor, Michigan found that 61% of mothers of children five and younger have been criticized for their parenting by strangers on social media.

Melissa Divaris Thompson, LMFT, an New York City-based therapist who works with new mothers says that women often bully and shame other mothers to validate their own parenting.

“As mothers, when we finally find something that feels right and true for us, we cling to it,” Thompson told Parents. “So when another mother makes a different choice, it’s sometimes easier to shame and blame, rather than sit with the fear that we made the wrong decision.”

Courtesy of FIELDTRIP
True

The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected diverse communities due largely in part to social factors such as inadequate access to housing, income, dietary options, education and employment — all of which have been shown to affect people's physical health.

Recognizing that inequity, Harlem-based chef JJ Johnson sought out to help his community maximize its health during the pandemic — one grain at a time.

Johnson manages FIELDTRIP, a health-focused restaurant that strives to bring people together through the celebration of rice, a grain found in cuisines of countless cultures.

"It was very important for me to show the world that places like Harlem want access to more health-conscious foods," Johnson said. "The people who live in Harlem should have the option to eat fresh, locally farmed and delicious food that other communities have access to."

Lack of education and access to those healthy food options is a primary driver of why 31% of adults in Harlem are struggling with obesity — the highest rate of any neighborhood in New York City and 7% higher than the average adult obesity rate across the five boroughs.

Obesity increases risk for heart disease or diabetes, which in turn leaves Harlem's residents — who are 76% Black or LatinX — at heightened risk for complications with COVID-19.

Keep Reading Show less
via KrustyKhajiit / YouTube

Thomas F. Wilson played one of the most recognizable villains in film history, Biff Tannen, in the "Back to the Future" series. So, understandably, he gets recognized wherever he goes for the iconic role.

The attention must be nice, but it has to get exhausting answering the same questions day in and day out about the films. So Wilson created a card that he carries with him to hand out to people that answers all the questions he gets asked on a daily basis.

Keep Reading Show less
Courtesy of FIELDTRIP
True

The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected diverse communities due largely in part to social factors such as inadequate access to housing, income, dietary options, education and employment — all of which have been shown to affect people's physical health.

Recognizing that inequity, Harlem-based chef JJ Johnson sought out to help his community maximize its health during the pandemic — one grain at a time.

Johnson manages FIELDTRIP, a health-focused restaurant that strives to bring people together through the celebration of rice, a grain found in cuisines of countless cultures.

"It was very important for me to show the world that places like Harlem want access to more health-conscious foods," Johnson said. "The people who live in Harlem should have the option to eat fresh, locally farmed and delicious food that other communities have access to."

Lack of education and access to those healthy food options is a primary driver of why 31% of adults in Harlem are struggling with obesity — the highest rate of any neighborhood in New York City and 7% higher than the average adult obesity rate across the five boroughs.

Obesity increases risk for heart disease or diabetes, which in turn leaves Harlem's residents — who are 76% Black or LatinX — at heightened risk for complications with COVID-19.

Keep Reading Show less

I saw this poster today and I was going to just let it go, but then I kept feeling tugged to say something.

Melanie Cholish/Facebook

While this poster is great to bring attention to the issue of child trafficking, it is a "shocking" picture of a young girl tied up. It has that dark gritty feeling. I picture her in a basement tied to a dripping pipe.

While that sounds awful, it's important to know that trafficking children in the US is not all of that. I can't say it never is—I don't know. What I do know is most young trafficked children aren't sitting in a basement tied up. They have families, and someone—usually in their family—is trafficking them.

Keep Reading Show less
via WatchMojo / YouTube

There are two conflicting viewpoints when it comes to addressing culture from that past that contains offensive elements that would never be acceptable today.

Some believe that old films, TV shows, music or books with out-of-date, offensive elements should be hidden from public view. While others think they should be used as valuable tools that help us learn from the past.

Keep Reading Show less