A 6-year-old's advice to her parents about how to handle their divorce is spot-on.

6-year-old Tiana wants her parents to be friends.

Tiana's mom, Cherish, posted a video of her daughter giving some advice after Cherish and Tiana's dad, who are divorced, had a fight.


The video has taken off across the Internet because, besides the fact that Tiana's absolutely adorable, she's full of wisdom about how we should treat each other. It's simple stuff, but many of us adults could stand to hear it.

Tiana wants her parent to be friends. She's trying to be nice — and she expects her parents to be nice too.

I think most of us who came from two-parent households — whether our parents stayed together or ended up divorcing — can recall our parents arguing at some point.

For kids, those fights can come with a really unsettling feeling:



Nobody gets along all the time. But disagreeing sometimes is one thing — treating each other poorly is another.

Tiana says it so simply: Settle those "mean heights" down to "short heights."

She also talks about wanting everyone to smile, which is a totally normal desire for kids.

When kids are young, if we seem happy, they usually feel secure. But it's kind of a fact of life that we can't be happy alllll the time. And it's not authentic — nor does it give our kids coping skills in life — if we hide every last one of our unhappy feelings.

And while we parents are pretty good at faking it, there are times when it's just not possible — or honest. And that's OK. But it's important for us to talk to kids about feelings and to reassure them that having sad or angry feelings is a part of life. It doesn't mean things will always be like this, and they need to know that.

It's like we learned in the Disney movie "Inside Out": All kinds of feelings are normal and valid. And if we learn how to process and express them in healthy ways versus stuffing them down or letting them out in damaging ways, we'll be better for it. So will our kids.

Tiana really brings it home with her final message: Let's make things as good as possible.

Divorce and conflict are not awesome, but we can make them, as she says, "as good as possible."

Watch Tiana give her mom — and the rest of us — some spot-on advice about how to live life!

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Photo by Adelin Preda on Unsplash

A multinational study found that bystanders intervene in 9 out of 10 public conflicts.

The recent news report of a woman on a Philadelphia train being raped while onlookers did nothing to stop it was shocking and horrible, without question. It also got people discussing the infamous "bystander effect," which has led people to believe—somewhat erroneously, as it turns out—that people aren't likely to intervene when they see someone being attacked in public. Stories like this uninterrupted train assault combined with a belief that bystanders rarely step in can easily lead people to feel like everything and everyone is horrible.

But according to the most recent research on the subject, the Philadelphia incident appears to be the exception, not the rule. A 2019 multinational study found that at least one bystander (but usually more) will actually intervene in 9 out of 10 public conflicts.

The idea that people in groups aren't likely to intervene stems largely from research on the 1964 story of Kitty Genovese, a 28-year-old woman who was stabbed to death outside her apartment in New York, while dozens of onlookers in surrounding apartment buildings allegedly did nothing. However, further research has called the number of witnesses into question, and it appears that several did, in fact, call the police. Someone reportedly shouted out their window and scared the attacker away for a few minutes, and someone did rush to Genovese's aid after the second attack.

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