3 young people were killed in North Carolina last night, yet no one is using the 'T' word.

Horrible news out of North Carolina on Feb. 10, 2015.


Three young people were killed. And two of them were newlyweds.


Just devastating.

When a tragic mass murder happens somewhere in the world, social media is usually covered wall to wall with calls for remembrance from prominent people like this one.


But in this case, many were hesitant to grieve for the victims publicly. And the reason why is absolutely heartbreaking.


All of the victims were practicing Muslims. And the man who murdered them was an atheist.

And that's not the only tragic part. While no one is sure what the shooter's motive was, some thought it was only fair to compare the media coverage of the shooting to the coverage of other recent shootings.

The biggest difference? The word "terrorism" is pretty much nowhere to be found.


Some were even more pointed.



Whether you agree with how often the media is quick to label senseless acts of violence "terrorism" or not, the fact remains that the victims were just as much human beings as those who were murdered for drawing cartoons or shopping at a kosher supermarket in Paris, and their deaths are no less tragic or less important.

One of those victims was Deah Barakat. His Twitter feed is full of jokes about basketball and football. And wisdom like this.


He was studying to be a dentist. And he had planned to use his skills for good by raising money to provide dental care to Syrian refugees.

Even though he's gone, his work deserves to live on. Here's how it can.


Because at the end of the day, one thing is absolutely, positively undeniable:


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Twitter / The Hollywood Reporter

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