How War Gets Filmed When Other Countries Won't Send Their Journalists In

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Now that most foreign press won't enter Syria for fear of getting killed, the only option left to Syrians hoping for representation is to grab a camera and do it themselves. Hussein used to sell apartments, but now he risks his life for no pay to get the word out.

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Hussein: When the revolution started, of course as any person from Syria, I started to work for the revolution.

Narrator: Hussein used to sell apartments, but since the uprising began in Syria the economy in the war-torn country has stalled, leaving him with no apartments to sell.

Hussein: Almost all the jobs stopped in Syria, so I started to work as a "media man."

Narrator: Hussein works voluntarily, taking video images and still photographs of the demonstrations for the foreign press, who rarely send in their own reporters now due to the dangers of reporting from Syria, or simply posting it to his YouTube channels. He risks life and limb on a daily basis for no pay.

Hussein: When the army came to Quasyr city, I was recording the soldiers when they were entering and searching in the houses. So, at that time they arrested me, and after that I stayed in the prison for four months.

Narrator: Hussein visits Free Syrian Army units at night, which each have their own small media center, complete with combat cameras and computers. They record any operation of the Free Syrian Army, or FSA, does in the area, uploading the images and videos for all the world to see. The days in the media center pass slowly. In war, one spends more time waiting than anything else. Hussein and his colleagues subsist mainly on locally grown produce. Dinner is always the same: potatoes, cucumbers, pasta, and some seasonal fruit. The citizen journalists mobilize whenever there is a demonstration, funeral, or an attack by the Syrian government. They've uploaded thousands of videos, like this one, since the fighting began. One of Hussein's other jobs is to receive foreign journalists who are interested in reporting in Syria. The majority of them come from neighboring Arab countries.

Hussein: Each unit have a media center for showing everything they do on the ground, destroying the tanks. Any operation they do, they load it to the Internet. They want to show the world the Free Army's work.

Narrator: The media center keeps its spirits alive with a revolutionary song, cameras and rifles always within reach.

There may be small errors in this transcript.
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