Company To Female Employees: No Birth Control For You. We Only Invest In It To Make Money.

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Hobby Lobby does not want to indirectly provide birth control to its employees via its health plan. In fact, the company has been so adamant about its position, which it claims is based on religious grounds, that it took its case all the way to the Supreme Court.

As it turns out, Hobby Lobby's retirement plan had more than $73 million invested in mutual funds that had stakes in... wait for it... manufacturers of contraceptive products like, you know, Plan B (the "morning after" pill), IUDs, and birth control pills.

Apparently, Hobby Lobby does not want anything to do with providing its female employees who wish to control their own fertility with a very basic and important tool like the birth control pill. But the company is willing to look the other way when said birth control items are good for the bottom line.

Where I'm from (planet earth), we call that hypocrisy.

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Cenk Uygur: Now, Hobby Lobby is a craft store and they're very angry that they would have to provide insurance for their employees that contains birth control, contraception. But, their good Christians and they want to be able to deny that to people, so that when they have sex you automatically have kids.

Now, when you have sex and have an unwanted pregnancies, is there a chance you have more abortions? Let's not think that through, OK. They know one thing, and that's Jesus Christ and Noah were against contraception. OK, but they're very consistent on this and they want to make sure their employees do not get it. That's why they went all the way to the Supreme Court. Now an interesting thing happened, having The Post look into this. They found that Hobby Lobby invests their money. Which, makes sense right? They're going to put their money somewhere, and lets find out where they invested it.

Hobby Lobby's attorney argue that the provision in the Affordable Care Act. First of all, this is the Supreme Court case that I was talking about, of course. That requires most employers to cover contraception in their health plans infringes on the company's right to exercise religious freedom because the company's owners believe that emergency contraception and IUDs are actually forms of abortion. Interesting, so where do they put their money?

Hobby Lobby's 401(k) plan holds $73 million in mutual funds that invest in multiple pharmaceutical companies that produce emergency contraceptive pills, intrauterine devices. That would be an IUD, and abortion-inducing medications.

No, no, no, no, when it comes to their principles they will not bend. Unless, of course, I mean its $73 million and I have to make money right? You know what I'm saying, dog? OK.

The companies Hobby Lobby invests in include Teva Pharmaceuticals Industries, which makes the Plan B morning, oops. Which makes the plan B morning-after pill, a copper IUD, as well as Pfizer, the maker of the abortion-induced drugs Cytotec and Prostin E2.

Interesting, all right, well, we're probably done with that right? You had the sense I had one more?

Hobby Lobby's mutual funds also invest in two health insurance companies that cover surgical abortions, abortion drugs, and emergency contraception in their health care policies. I believe that deserves another, what happened? I thought you had principles. Oh, when it comes to money. I mean we have principles when it comes to our employees. And denying them insurance, and denying them health insurance or contraception, or what they want. What they want? What do you mean what they want? When it comes to money, Lebowski, well that's a different situation. You know what? Have abortions. Have at it.

There may be small errors in this transcript.
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The Young Turks created this video, which is based on this HuffPo article. That was written after Mother Jones published a very comprehensive article on Hobby Lobby's investments. I love Mother Jones, and I think the article is totally worth your time.

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