This man's thank-you to Chelsea first responders represents the best of New York.

On Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016, a bomb went off in the New York City neighborhood of Chelsea.

As of this writing, there are still many unknown details. But we do know 29 people were injured and the act was intentional.

Photo by Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images.


Immediately after the explosion, NYPD officers rushed to the scene and began an investigation. Within hours, they found a second device and prevented it from exploding. On Monday, Sept. 19, a suspect was identified and arrested.

It's times like this when we all need to take a moment and appreciate our first responders.

Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

When they're rushing toward the scene that everyone else is running away from — putting themselves in harm's way to keep the rest of us safe — they deserve our respect and our deepest thanks.

And maybe a cup of coffee.  

That's why this man showed up in Chelsea to give the officers there a well-earned pick-me-up.

His name is Jermaine, and he was captured on video handing NYPD and FDNY officials cups of coffee and bags of pastries from Starbucks — as a thank-you for their hard work.

ACT OF KINDNESS

ACT OF KINDNESS » As NYPD Guards the Explosion Scene Created by the Worst in People, First Responders Get Free Starbucks Delivered by New Yorkers, Seeing the Best in PeopleWe flew a crew to NYC to cover the #ChelseaNYC explosions the governor called terrorism this morning. Officials have not yet linked it to an international group. More stories like this to come.

Posted by KnightNews.com on Sunday, September 18, 2016

In the video, Jermaine says he wishes he could do more for the first responders keeping his neighborhood safe. The thankful officers say they are just happy to help.

Despite what you may think of New Yorkers, this small act of kindness isn't out of character.

Sure, most of us New Yorkers spend our days with tunnel vision — hopping from subway to subway, deli to coffee shop, just trying to get where we're going and make ends meet.

What little interaction we have with each other is either desperately shoving our way onto the 6 train or cursing at the cab driver who slammed on his brakes and stopped about four inches short of killing us in the crosswalk.

But there's so much more to the people of NYC than that. With the collective acceptance of the madness of city life, we also understand the importance of lifting each other up in times of need.

The secret to living in New York City is having each other's backs.  

Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

That's never more clear than when a tragedy strikes, and we're forced to take a moment and see if everyone's OK.

For better or worse, New Yorkers know how to handle things like this.

We may go back to ignoring and yelling at each other soon, but when the chips are down, the best of us are there to help, say thank-you, and hand over a bag of muffins.

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In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

1 / 12

Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

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In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

1 / 12

Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

It sounds like a ridiculous, sensationalist headline, but it's real. In Cheshire County, New Hampshire, a transsexual, anarchist Satanist has won the GOP nomination for county sheriff. Aria DiMezzo, who refers to herself as a "She-Male" and whose campaign motto was "F*** the Police," ran as a Republican in the primary. Though she ran unopposed on the ballot, according to Fox News, she anticipated that she would lose to a write-in candidate. Instead, 4,211 voters filled in the bubble next to her name, making her the official Republican candidate for county sheriff.

DiMezzo is clear about why she ran—to show how "clueless the average voter is" and to prove that "the system is utterly and hopelessly broken"—stances that her win only serves to reinforce.

In a blog post published on Friday, DiMezzo explained how she had never tried to hide who she was and that anyone could have looked her up to see what she was about, in addition to pointing out that those who are angry with her have no one to blame but themselves:

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Courtesy of Back on My Feet
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Having graduated in the top 10% of Reserve Officer Training Corp (ROTC) cadets nationwide in 2012, Pat Robinson was ready to take on a career in the Air Force full speed ahead.

Despite her stellar performance in the classroom and training grounds, Robinson feared other habits she'd picked up at Ohio University had sent her down the wrong tracks.

First stationed near Panama City, Florida, Robinson became reliant on alcohol while serving as an air battle manager student. After barnstorming through Atlanta's nightclubs on New Year's Eve, Robinson failed a drug test and lied to her commanding officer about the results.

Eleven months later, she was dismissed. Feeling ashamed and directionless, Robinson briefly returned home to Cleveland before venturing west to look for work in San Francisco.

After a brief stint working at a paint store, Robinson found herself without a source of income and was relegated to living in her car. Robinson's garbage can soon became littered with parking tickets and her car was towed. Golden Gate Park's cool grass soon replaced her bed.

"My substance abuse spiraled very quickly," Robinson said. "You name it, I probably used it. Very quickly I contracted HIV and Hepatitis C. I was arrested again and again and was finally charged and sentenced to substance abuse treatment."

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