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The therapy dogs at Walter Reed are not magic. (OK, maybe a little bit.)

When you're going through something really hard, sometimes what you need is a warm, fuzzy, adorable distraction.

The therapy dogs at Walter Reed are not magic. (OK, maybe a little bit.)
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The magic science is compelling. Therapy dogs really do seem to help sick and injured people recover.

Therapy dogs like those at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in the above video by Military Health aren't random dogs from a local shelter. These are highly trained, certified dogs with handlers. Therapy and emotional support dogs have been shown to help veterans break out of their emotional shells, leading to more productive therapy sessions and better relationships with loved ones.

More research is needed into how exactly therapy dogs help mitigate the problems that wounded veterans experience, but we've known for a very long time that having pets β€” especially dogs β€” grants some pretty serious health benefits.


Why do dogs make us feel good?

One big reason: They stimulate our brains to create oxytocin.

Quick neurochemistry lesson:

Oxytocin is a hormone that the brain excretes during certain social interactions. It does a few neat magic tricks on the mind and the body. Scientists have found that oxytocin:

  • helps us bond with our friends, romantic partners, and family (especially children),
  • prompts our bodies to heal themselves,
  • helps us trust each other, and
  • reduces anxiety, fear, and stress.

How awesome is all that?

This awesome:

Do you think a dog can have an impact on happiness?

Go pet your dog and then tell me. If you don't have a dog, pet someone else's dog. (But always ask first.)

When the COVID-19 pandemic socially distanced the world and pushed off the 2020 Olympics, we knew the games weren't going to be the same. The fact that they're even happening this year is a miracle, but without spectators and the usual hustle and bustle surrounding the events, it definitely feels different.

But it's not just the games themselves that have changed. The coverage of the Olympics has changed as well, including the unexpected addition of un-expert, uncensored commentary from comedian Kevin Hart and rapper Snoop Dogg on NBC's Peacock.

In the topsy-turvy world we're currently living in, it's both a refreshing and hilarious addition to the Olympic lineup.

Just watch this clip of them narrating an equestrian event. (Language warning if you've got kiddos nearby. The first video is bleeped, but the others aren't.)

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