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via Richard Masoner / Cyclelicious / Flickr

It's probably pretty hard for someone born outside of the United States to make sense of our country. It's large, has a diverse population, and its topography encompasses everything from low deserts to frozen Arctic climates to dense forests.

However, the United States is probably the most culturally dominant society in the world. People across the globe read our books, watch our movies, and listen to our music. So most people probably have a clearer concept of what life's like in our country then we do about them.

A British man that goes by the Twitter handle human_not_bees (Beës) tested his knowledge of the country across the pond by listing all of America's states and then saying what he thinks they're known for best. He claims he did so without Googling.


He was confident that he could get most of them right because U.S. culture is "pretty pervasive," he told Bored Panda. "We see enough of it that we learn these things from TV shows and movies. Also, you guys have some pretty cheesy TV that seems very willing to lean into the stereotypes of people and places, so really, you guys did this to yourselves," he added.

Here's his list. Do you think he got most of the states right?





It looks like this guy got Florida perfect. It's also the state where people in America say, "Oh God, this country." But let's not be too cruel to sunny Florida, it's also home to Disney World and was where "The Birdcage" was filmed. So it's not all that bad.





I'm a little surprised that Beës didn't know Louisiana is home to New Orleans one of the most culturally significant cities on planet Earth. It's the birthplace of jazz, poker, and Lil Wayne.


He's right about Maryland, even Americans have no idea what happens in Maryland.





Ahh, we get it. America borrowed a few geographical names from places in England. But who helped you beat the Nazis in World War II? Thought so.




Is this a Paul M. Sutter reference?


via Ohioana Library / Twitter






Yep.










So how did he do? If he were American I'd give him a D+. But as a Brit, he has a pretty strong understanding of America. I wonder how many Americans would be able to do something similar with the U.K.? What's Wolverhampton best known for? How about Wyre Piddle? Giggleswick? Scranton on Themes?

(Just kidding. There is no such place as Scranton on Themes.)

While on vacation for the Fourth of July, late-night host Stephen Colbert invited his followers to share their "brush with #AmericanGreatness."

"American greatness" was never defined, but Colbert shared his visit to the home of renowned poet and writer Carl Sandburg in North Carolina to kick things off.

From sea to shining sea, thousands of fans replied to Colbert, sharing their holiday plans and examples of American greatness.

Users shared all kinds of landmarks, food, photos of their loved ones, natural wonders, and more worth celebrating on America's birthday. Here are just some of the tweets from the awe-inspiring list.


Whether you're in a big, bustling city or a small, quiet town...

...you are never far from American greatness.

There were crystal clear waters...

...and breathtaking views.

Some celebrated with their patriotic kiddos.

Some shared greatness with the next generation, charged to build and protect it.

Lots of people took in America's rich history and culture museums...

...and stunning historical markers.

These are the places where dreams take shape...

...and take flight.

To say nothing of this giant ice cream cone, which is great in its own kind of way.

(And perfect for ice cream month!)

Others preferred to get outdoors to take in some of nature's bounty.

And celebrate the wide open spaces that make this country so beautiful.

Not everyone has the weekend off, but like these hardworking folks, greatness doesn't take a vacation.

But it wouldn't be America's birthday without barbecue...

...sweet, sweet, barbecue.

Or fireworks. Can't forget fireworks.

But ultimately, American greatness is in each and every one of us.

Those who work hard, compromise, believe in better, and support people who need it. That's a promise we can all live up to. We must.

This post was updated 12/12/2017.

Last week, President Donald Trump announced he will withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate accord. Other world leaders are not hesitating to capitalize on that decision.

The day before Trump's announcement to leave the international commitment to fight climate change, French President Emmanuel Macron trolled Trump, retooling the U.S. president's campaign catchphrase in a speech, encouraging everyone to "Make Our Planet Great Again."


This week, Macron doubled down on the sentiment and launched a website to help those passionate about climate change research emigrate to France.

And what's the address to this digital one-stop shop for those looking to move to France?

www.MakeOurPlanetGreatAgain.fr.

[rebelmouse-image 19527066 dam="1" original_size="400x222" caption="Oh snap! GIF via "The Maury Show."" expand=1]Oh snap! GIF via "The Maury Show."

The site serves as a clearing house for information about education, work, and research opportunities as well as links to the necessary applications and documents one would need to emigrate to France.

For those unsure if France is right for them or overwhelmed by the daunting process of emigration, users can describe where they're from and the work or research they do and receive information appropriate to their situation. There are different pages for students, researchers, nonprofits, and entrepreneurs.

While this particular call to acton is not limited to Americans, Macron has previously invited American scientists to continue their research in France.

Macron made an appeal in February, before he was elected president, encouraging Americans to consider working in France in the wake of Trump's skepticism about climate change.

GIF via Tristan Oliver/YouTube.

With the launch of the site, it's clear Macron is standing by his campaign promise and looking around the globe for top talent, no matter whose toes he may step on.

And his offer to researchers isn't just lip service; there are funding opportunities to back it up.

After successfully submitting project proposals and other relevant documents, senior and junior researchers may be eligible for a four-year grant covering their salary, staff and student salaries, and work expenses, up to 1.5 million euros.

That may be a difficult offer to turn down, especially as America's local and federal governments grapple with potential budget cuts, especially for climate related research.

A NASA flight crew member works inside a NASA Operation IceBridge DC-8 research airplane. NASA's Operation IceBridge has been studying how polar ice has evolved over the past eight years. Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

Macron and 193 other world leaders have committed to getting serious about climate change.

Trump's efforts to put politics over the planet will not stop climate change or the people working to solve it.

No matter our countries of origin, this is a global problem that will require global solutions. Kudos to Macron and other world leaders who are giving this issue the time, attention, and resources it deserves.

While Americans sat enthralled in front of their TV screens on June 8, watching James Comey testify in front of the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee, shocking general election results began trickling in from across the pond.

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May. Photo by Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images.


About two months ago, U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May called for a general election this summer in hopes of expanding the majority held by her Conservative Party (the Tories) in Parliament. Most Brits thought she'd succeed.

But as ballots were being counted last night, her hopes faded — and fast.

While there was no decisive winner walking away from the contest — May's party only won a plurality — the Tories lost a handful of seats and its majority in Parliament, bucking most election predictions in a dramatic fashion. The Tories' losses mean there is no majority party at the moment, resulting in a messy hung Parliament. May might not be prime minister much longer.

So ... what happened, exactly?

Young. People. Voted.

Official election tallies are still being counted, with many reports relying on surveys and exit polling to read into the behaviors of U.K. voters. But early data is pointing toward at least one significant factor: determinedyoung people.

Early estimates suggest roughly 72% of young people aged 18-24 voted, according to NBC News. This marks a sizable uptick since the "Brexit" vote last summer and a massive increase from the 2015 elections, when just 43% of that demographic turned out.

To May's dismay, the vast majority of young people voted for her chief political opponent, left-leaning Jeremy Corbyn.

Corbyn — the leader of the Labour Party, who wanted the U.K. to remain in the European Union — sold voters on the promises of raising taxes on the wealthy, avoiding military interventions in foreign countries, and restoring "politics for the people."

Jeremy Corbyn, the new favorite to be the next prime minister. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images.

"My friends were physically cheering in the streets," Craig McDonald, a 25-year-old who voted in favor of the Labour Party, told Bloomberg. "I was loving it."

Depending on how the hung Parliament shakes out, Corbyn could be the country's next prime minister.

There are many differences between elections in the U.K. and the U.S., but certain similarities between the electorates and political climates in both countries could be a cause of concern for President Donald Trump and the GOP.

Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images.

Some are dubbing the U.K.'s election results the "revenge of the youth." And certain signs are painting a similar picture state-side ahead of the midterm elections next fall.

Trump's approval rating is historically poor (no matter which way you slice it), but it's even more dismal among younger Americans. People across many demographics are unhappy with the president's agenda, but young people (and women) have taken on particularly important roles in the resistance.

In a special House election in Georgia, Democrat Jon Ossoff is polling surprisingly well in a historically red district over Republican Karen Handel with just two weeks to go before voters hit the ballot box. Ossoff's chances of winning — bolstered by enthusiasm among young people — is being closely watched from Washington as a test of the anti-Trump movement in battleground (and even deep red) regions of the country.

Will young Americans make the difference in the 2018 midterms?

Jon Ossoff with his supporters in Georgia. Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

The U.K. and U.S. are different countries, of course, with various factors playing important roles in shaping voters' opinions of who should represent them in office.

But if young people's thirst for change in the U.K. reflects the attitudes and determination of young Americans in 2018, next year may shape up to be quite the headache for the man in the White House right now.