In order to get a gymnastics move named after you, you have to submit the skill for consideration and then successfully land it in a major competition. As of 2016, there were 11 female gymnasts with moves named after them. Simone Biles was one of them. Now, she's heading into "living legend" territory. This weekend, Biles performed two of her signature moves at the world championships in Stuttgart, Germany this weekend. Not only did she land them, they're now getting her name.

Her double dismount on the balance beam will now be known at "the Biles." She was the first person to land the move at the US Gymnastics Championships in August, so the moniker is all the more fitting. Her triple-double, a move that includes a double backflip and three twists, will now forever be known as "the Biles II."




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The crowd went wild (on Twitter).








Biles has two other gymnastic moves named after her, and has the most world championships gold medals of any female gymnast. Ladies and gentlemen, she is only 22-years-old. Maybe we should just call totally dominating in your field a "Biles" as well?

Despite all of her skill and accomplishments, Biles remains humble. "I feel like I'm pretty pleased just because that's how I train beam, and it finally felt good to go out there and hit a beam routine like I train because I feel like every time I go up to compete beam, I just bomb it. So it felt really good to just nail it," Biles told the Olympic Channel. "My goal going into tonight was to not be great ... it wasn't to do great, but just to do well, and I feel like I accomplished that," she said.

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It's more impressive that Biles is kicking ass and taking names while she's still in the process of healing following the Larry Nassar sexual abuse scandal. "I was like, 'No, I'm not willing to put that out there for the world to see. They're not gonna see me as Simone the gymnast, they're gonna see Simone as the sexual abuse survivor.' And so I denied it, and I buried it," Bliles said of her experiences on the You Tube special If I Could Tell You Just One Thing. "I was very depressed, I like never left my room. I was sleeping all the time and I told like one of my lawyers, 'I sleep all the time because it's the closest thing to death.'"

Earlier this year, Biles also called out USA Gymnastics for failing to protect her and her fellow gymnasts. "We had one job. And we have done everything that they asked us for — even when we didn't want to," she said, per the Washington Post. "And they couldn't do one damn job! You had one job; you literally had one job, and you couldn't protect us!"

Simone Biles is all kinds of inspirational. While most of us aren't running around getting moves named after us, it is a reminder that you can still have major accomplishments no matter what's going on around you.

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

When schools closed early in the spring, the entire country was thrown for a loop. Parents had to figure out what to do with their kids. Teachers had to figure out how to teach students at home. Kids had to figure out how to navigate a totally new routine that was being created and altered in real time.

For many families, it was a big honking mess—one that many really don't want to repeat in the fall.

But at the same time, the U.S. hasn't gotten a handle on the coronavirus pandemic. As states have begun reopening—several of them too early, according to public health officials—COVID-19 cases have risen to the point where we now have more cases per day than we did during the height of the outbreak in the spring. And yet President Trump is making a huge push to get schools to reopen fully in the fall, even threatening to possibly remove funding if they don't.

It's worth pointing out that Denmark and Norway had 10 and 11 new cases yesterday. Sweden and Germany had around 300 each. The U.S. had 55,000. (And no, that's not because we're testing thousands of times more people than those countries are.)

The president of the country's largest teacher's union had something to say about Trump's push to reopen schools. Lily Eskelsen Garcia says that schools do need to reopen, but they need to be able to reopen safely—with measures that will help keep both students and teachers from spreading the virus and making the pandemic worse. (Trump has also criticized the CDCs "very tough & expensive guidelines" for reopening schools.)

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