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People are dyeing their hair like space, and it's awesome.

Some intentional, others by accident. All gorgeously sciencey.

People are dyeing their hair like space, and it's awesome.

Who says that space can't be glamorous?

OK, OK — no one has said that, but maybe this is a topic worth discussing.

Because ... LOOK.


Instagram photos used with permission, featuring (clockwise from lower left) @tbmhair, @skittles.senpai, @theleopardloungemach, @ghostiee.

SPACE HAIR IS A THING.

A beautiful thing. So I looked into this. There are a handful of specific space hair moments, but there are droves of beautiful hair colors that look downright galactic.

Looking at all the hair-color trends out there, I couldn't help but think, "I SEE SPACE, PEOPLE."

Here are just five of the many many beautiful colors of hair that can mean only one thing: Space hair is happening.

1. This hair might not have intended to be inspired by Charon, Pluto's moon, but can you deny the resemblance?

Image via NASA, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, and Southwest Research Institute.

A photo posted by Daryna Barykina Photography (@daryna_barykina) on

A stronger color at the roots and classy gray. Werk!

A photo posted by Marygene Rose (@marygenemua) on

Charon the moon no longer gets to say it orbits a planet due to Pluto's demotion, but still, it's lookin' good immortalized in hair.





2. And here we have the Veil Nebula of hair-colors.

A photo posted by @its_lindsay_again on

Image via NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team.

Right?!

According to NASA, "This close-up look unveils wisps of gas, which are all that remain of what was once a star 20 times more massive than our sun."

Whoa!

3. If you squint, this woman's head IS the Northern Lights.

A photo posted by Samantha Daly (@bottleblonde76) on


4. NASA just got images from the Hubble telescope of the Twin Jet Nebula, a binary star system that also goes by the name of PN M2-9. And lo, this gal is rocking it in hair form.

Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA. Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt

A photo posted by Samantha Daly (@bottleblonde76) on

5. Here we have an uncannily accurate representation of what NASA describes as "planetary nebula called NGC 6818, also known as the Little Gem Nebula." Also — hair!

Image by ESA/Hubble and NASA with acknowledgement to Judy Schmidt.

NASA describes it adorably:

"This colorful bubble is a planetary nebula called NGC 6818, also known as the Little Gem Nebula. It is located in the constellation of Sagittarius (The Archer), roughly 6,000 light-years away from us. The rich glow of the cloud is just over half a light-year across — humongous compared to its tiny central star — but still a little gem on a cosmic scale."
A photo posted by Dakota Driscoll (@dak42093) on

The cosmos has some really good color theory.

Space-aholic Neil deGrasse Tyson often laments that the wonder at space is disappearing from our lives.

We don't tilt our heads up in wonder at the complexities, the vastness, the coolness of space and the cosmos.

But there's space and the cosmos, re-appearing in a pretty special place ... hair salons.

Will a bunch of brightly colored hairdos help the space program or teach us enough science to explore space? Probably not.

But it just goes to show, we've still got space love in (er, on) our heads.

And that if we put our heads together (even if they're not dyed to look like nebulae), we still sometimes look up in wonder.

Image by 5540867 from Pixabay

Figuring out what to do for a mom on Mother's Day can be a tricky thing. There's the standard flowers or candy, of course, and taking her out to a nice brunch is a fairly universal winner. But what do moms really want?

Speaking from experience—my kids range from age 12 to 20—a lot depends on the stage of motherhood. What I wanted when my kids were little is different than what I want now, and I'm sure when my kids are grown and gone I'll want something different again.

We asked our readers to share what they want for Mother's Day, and while the answers were varied, there were some common themes that emerged.

Moms of young kids want a break.

When your kids are little, motherhood is relentless. Precious and adorable, yes. Wonderful and rewarding, absolutely. But it's a LOT. And it's a lot all the fricking time.

Most moms I know would love the gift of alone time, either away at a hotel or Airbnb or in their own home with no one else around. Time alone is a priceless commodity at this stage, especially if it comes with someone else taking care of cleaning, making sure the kids are fed and safe and occupied, doing the laundry, etc.

This is especially true after more than a year of pandemic living, where we moms have spent more time than usual at home with our offspring. While in some ways that's been great, again, it's a lot.

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Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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