'Lord of the Flies' is about toxic masculinity. 2 men want it to be about girls instead.

You remember “Lord of the Flies,” right? The book we all had to read in junior high?

In case you don’t, it’s the 1950s novel (made into a film in 1963) about a group of preparatory school boys who find themselves stranded on an island without any adults. Things quickly devolve as they try to survive; there is violence and death and mayhem.

It’s not a feel-good story.


Cut to 2017, where Deadline announced this week that a remake of this classic story is in the works — with a twist.

Following the current trend of gender-swapping classic movies — which Hollywood is apparently not tired of yet — the children trapped on the island in the reboot will be girls.

People on Twitter were not having it.

The idea of taking the basic story of "Lord of the Flies" and giving it a new gender spin isn't automatically awful, but these critiques raise some good points.

For many, the book has long been viewed as highlighting what people today call "toxic masculinity," the idea that, if left unchecked, all men — of any age — will fall back on violence and aggression. How that story will translate to an all-female cast is anybody’s guess.

Done well, it could end up being a compelling and meaningful story full of well-rounded and diverse characters struggling to surive ... who just happen to be female. To make that happen, however, the film would likely need to be a pretty solid departure from the original novel.

But it doesn’t sound like that's the plan.

The project is being spearheaded by two men, the filmmaking duo of Scott McGehee and Evan Siegel, who say they plan to create a "very faithful but contemporized adaptation of the book … with the interpersonal conflicts and bullying."

Which isn’t inspiring a lot of confidence in how this is going to all shake out.

It's no secret that gender disparity remains alive and well in Hollywood — despite movies helmed by women showing they can more than carry their weight — so a project with an all-female cast sounds like a great idea. But it just seems like there's got to be a better way to elevate women in film than an all-girl retelling of "Lord of the Flies" created by two men.

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Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

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Of the millions of Americans breathing a sigh of relief with the ushering in of a new president, one man has a particularly personal and professional reason to exhale.

Dr. Anthony Fauci has spent a good portion of his long, respected career preparing for a pandemic, and unfortunately, the worst one in 100 years hit under the worst possible administration. As part of Trump's Coronavirus Task Force, Dr. Fauci did what he could to advise the president and share information with the public, but it's been clear for months that the job was made infinitely more difficult than it should have been by anti-science forces within the administration.

To his credit, Dr. Fauci remained politically neutral through it all this past year, totally in keeping with his consistently non-partisan, apolitical approach to his job. Even when the president badmouthed him, blocked him from testifying before the House, and kept him away from press briefings, Fauci took the high road, always keeping his commentary focused on the virus and refusing to step into the political fray.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.