'Lord of the Flies' is about toxic masculinity. 2 men want it to be about girls instead.

You remember “Lord of the Flies,” right? The book we all had to read in junior high?

In case you don’t, it’s the 1950s novel (made into a film in 1963) about a group of preparatory school boys who find themselves stranded on an island without any adults. Things quickly devolve as they try to survive; there is violence and death and mayhem.

It’s not a feel-good story.


Cut to 2017, where Deadline announced this week that a remake of this classic story is in the works — with a twist.

Following the current trend of gender-swapping classic movies — which Hollywood is apparently not tired of yet — the children trapped on the island in the reboot will be girls.

People on Twitter were not having it.

The idea of taking the basic story of "Lord of the Flies" and giving it a new gender spin isn't automatically awful, but these critiques raise some good points.

For many, the book has long been viewed as highlighting what people today call "toxic masculinity," the idea that, if left unchecked, all men — of any age — will fall back on violence and aggression. How that story will translate to an all-female cast is anybody’s guess.

Done well, it could end up being a compelling and meaningful story full of well-rounded and diverse characters struggling to surive ... who just happen to be female. To make that happen, however, the film would likely need to be a pretty solid departure from the original novel.

But it doesn’t sound like that's the plan.

The project is being spearheaded by two men, the filmmaking duo of Scott McGehee and Evan Siegel, who say they plan to create a "very faithful but contemporized adaptation of the book … with the interpersonal conflicts and bullying."

Which isn’t inspiring a lot of confidence in how this is going to all shake out.

It's no secret that gender disparity remains alive and well in Hollywood — despite movies helmed by women showing they can more than carry their weight — so a project with an all-female cast sounds like a great idea. But it just seems like there's got to be a better way to elevate women in film than an all-girl retelling of "Lord of the Flies" created by two men.

via KrustyKhajiit / YouTube

Thomas F. Wilson played one of the most recognizable villains in film history, Biff Tannen, in the "Back to the Future" series. So, understandably, he gets recognized wherever he goes for the iconic role.

The attention must be nice, but it has to get exhausting answering the same questions day in and day out about the films. So Wilson created a card that he carries with him to hand out to people that answers all the questions he gets asked on a daily basis.

Keep Reading Show less
Courtesy of FIELDTRIP
True

The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected diverse communities due largely in part to social factors such as inadequate access to housing, income, dietary options, education and employment — all of which have been shown to affect people's physical health.

Recognizing that inequity, Harlem-based chef JJ Johnson sought out to help his community maximize its health during the pandemic — one grain at a time.

Johnson manages FIELDTRIP, a health-focused restaurant that strives to bring people together through the celebration of rice, a grain found in cuisines of countless cultures.

"It was very important for me to show the world that places like Harlem want access to more health-conscious foods," Johnson said. "The people who live in Harlem should have the option to eat fresh, locally farmed and delicious food that other communities have access to."

Lack of education and access to those healthy food options is a primary driver of why 31% of adults in Harlem are struggling with obesity — the highest rate of any neighborhood in New York City and 7% higher than the average adult obesity rate across the five boroughs.

Obesity increases risk for heart disease or diabetes, which in turn leaves Harlem's residents — who are 76% Black or LatinX — at heightened risk for complications with COVID-19.

Keep Reading Show less
via Marcella Mares / Facebook

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a lot of disruption to people's work and family balance as well as their educational pursuits. These days, people are required to do just about everything simultaneously as they attempt to handle business while taking care of their children.

Marcella, mother to a 10-month-old girl, received an email from one of her instructors at Fresno City College in California, requiring all students to turn on their cameras and microphones during class time.

The request makes sense being that online classes make it easier for some students to take advantage by ignoring the instructor.

Keep Reading Show less
via WatchMojo / YouTube

There are two conflicting viewpoints when it comes to addressing culture from that past that contains offensive elements that would never be acceptable today.

Some believe that old films, TV shows, music or books with out-of-date, offensive elements should be hidden from public view. While others think they should be used as valuable tools that help us learn from the past.

Keep Reading Show less