If the world could speak, it would say climate change, human rights, and health are a global priority.
Pexels.com
True

June 26, 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the signing of the United Nations Charter. Think of the Charter as the U.N.'s wedding vows, in which the institution solemnly promises to love and protect not one person, but the world. It's a union most of us can get behind, especially in light of recent history. We're less than seven months into 2020, and already it's established itself as a year of reckoning. The events of this year—ecological disaster, economic collapse, political division, racial injustice, and a pandemic—the complex ways those events feed into and amplify each other—have distressed and disoriented most of us, altering our very experience of time. Every passing month creaks under the weight of a decade's worth of history. Every quarantined day seems to bleed into the next.

But the U.N. was founded on the principles of peace, dignity, and equality (the exact opposite of the chaos, degradation, and inequality that seem to have become this year's ringing theme). Perhaps that's why, in its 75th year, the institution feels all the more precious and indispensable. When the U.N. proposed a "global conversation" in January 2020 (feels like thousands of years ago), many leapt to participate—200,000 within three months. The responses to surveys and polls, in addition to research mapping and media analysis, helped the U.N. pierce through the clamor—the roar of bushfire, the thunder of armed conflict, the ceaseless babble of talking heads—to actually hear what matters: our collective human voice.


So, what are our main concerns? Our top priorities for the future? Our most salient and urgent goals? Furthermore, what do we believe are our obstacles to achieving these goals? What role does global cooperation have in overcoming them?

If the world could speak, what would it say? It would say environmental protection, upholding human rights, less armed conflict and violence, equal access to basic services, and health risk, are a global priority.

Think about that: Before the pandemic had fully encompassed the world—when most countries were just reporting their first cases—health risks were a global priority. Before data revealed black Americans were disproportionately affected by Covid-19— before the murder of George Floyd kindled protests around the world—human rights, discrimination, and violence were a global priority. Before climate change caused an unprecedented number of tornadoes to rip through the midwestern United States, before fire engulfed northern regions of India, and Russia dumped 20,000 tons of diesel into Siberia, causing untold damage to the Arctic—the environment was a global priority.

People of the world: we have our priorities straight, and there's a lot of optimism to derive from that. But—if the past few months are any indication—that's not enough. In order to stop the rising tides of instability and injustice—in order to stop the literal rising tides—we must work together. Yes, international cooperation may not be the operating principle behind our increasingly nationalistic political rhetoric, but if you ask the people (and the U.N. did) an overwhelming majority—95%— agreed it's either "essential" or "very important." Perhaps, if we operate outside the traditional bureaucracy—adopt more of a bottom up approach to developing solutions, for example, and involve more women, youth, indigenous and vulnerable groups in decision-making—we can transform priorities to policy.

The UN75 initiative, which will run throughout 2020, is still in its early stages—they will continue rolling out the results of this global conversation throughout the year. Let's continue to listen. Let's continue to engage. In the face of so much divisiveness, it's somewhat encouraging to realize, at the end of each (very long) day, we all want the same thing.

Take this one-minute survey to share with the U.N. what you think should be global priorities now and moving forward.

True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


Sir David Attenborough has one of the most recognized and beloved voices in the world. The British broadcaster and nature historian has spent most of his 94 years on Earth educating humanity about the wonders of the natural world, inspiring multiple generations to care about the planet we all call home.

And now, Attenborough has made a new name for himself. Not only has he joined the cool kids on Instagram, he's broken the record for reaching a million followers in the shortest period. It only took four hours and 44 minutes, which is less time than it took Jennifer Aniston, who held the title before him at 5 hours and 16 minutes.

A day later, Attenborough is sitting at a whopping 3.4 million followers. And he only has two Instagram posts so far, both of them videos. But just watch his first one and you'll see why he's attracted so many fans.

Keep Reading Show less
True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


There are very few people who have had quite as memorable a life as Arnold Schwarzenegger. His adult life has played out in four acts, with each one arguably more consequential than the last.

And now Schwarzenegger wants to play a role in helping America, his adopted home, ensure that our 2020 election is safe, secure and available to everyone willing and able to vote.

Shortly after immigrating to America, Schwarzenegger rose up to become the most famous bodybuilder in history, turning what was largely a sideshow attraction into a legitimate sport. He then pivoted to an acting career, becoming Hollywood's highest paid star in a run that spanned three decades.


Keep Reading Show less

One night in 2018, Sheila and Steve Albers took their two youngest sons out to dinner. Their 17-year-old son, John, was in a crabby mood—not an uncommon occurrence for the teen who struggled with mental health issues—so he stayed home.

A half hour later, Sheila's started getting text messages that John wasn't safe. He had posted messages with suicidal ideations on social media and his friends had called the police to check on him. The Albers immediately raced home.

When they got there, they were met with a surreal scene. Their minivan was in the neighbor's yard across the street. John had been shot in the driver's seat six times by a police officer who had arrived to check on him. The officer had fired two shots as the teen slowly backed the van out of the garage, then 11 more after the van spun around backward. But all the officers told the Albers was that John had "passed" and had been shot. They wouldn't find out until the next day who had shot and killed him.

Keep Reading Show less