Homophobe claimed Pride Month is disrespectful to the military. Then, a veteran shut him down.

We're about halfway through pride month, which means we're also about halfway through every one of the hot takes about why we shouldn't have pride month, why it's too long, and why we don't need it anymore. SPOILER ALERT: WE DO. If only for the fact that there are so many people demanding that the LGBT+ community justify their existence.

Equality didn't happen just because gay people can marry now. And while things are markedly better than they were when I came out in 2002, homophobia and heterosexism still exist and there are still public officials out there (hi Alabama!) demanding that homosexuals be killed.


This year has also seen the added bonus of white supremacists (and those perilously adjacent) creating a "straight pride" parade in order to troll the "privilege" of those who identify as LGBT+. Because nothing says "privilege isn't real," like members of majority groups banding together to take something back from marginalized communities!

Fortunately, people are out here fighting the ignorance with education and support. In Oklahoma, for instance, a straight guy transformed his truck to challenge stereotypes and show love for those who've faced bigotry; on the celebrity front, Taylor Swift released a Pride anthem that you've got to admit (even if you don't like it) will likely change the minds of some of her more socially conservative fans. (That's another thing about Pride: We're going to need it until coming out in support of LGBT+ people isn't seen at all controversial or a "power move" for celebrities.)

Here's one more for the annals of "people correcting those arguing in bad faith." In the tradition of smugly asking when International Men's day is (It's November 19th!) on International Women's Day, a meme's been going around asking why Pride lasts an entire month when veterans get only a day to celebrate what they've done for this country. And a blistering Facebook response from a member of the military, which made the front page of Reddit, has got a lot of people's attention.



Reddit

"The entire month of May is Military Appreciation Month and has been since 1999," wrote the Facebook user.

"I have never once had my life threatened due to being in the military however members of the LGBTQ+ communities are threatened and killed every single day over something they have no control over."

After pointing out that being gay is still illegal in many, many places around the world (even in the US, we're still fighting for federal protection from discrimination in all 50 states), the author closed with this: "This post is incredibly ignorant and if you'd and the others who've shared this post truely [sic] cared about military members then you'd know May was NMAM and not just us as an argument for your homophobia."

The writer's got more than a point. There's no reason to pit communities against each other. And when people do so just for the purpose of denigrating others — a quick google search would have made it clear that NMAM happens every May, so it would have been easy to raise awareness if that was the goal! — they're showing that they don't actually care about the causes they purport to be championing. They're just trying to tear others down.

And that's just another reminder of why we still need Pride.

From Your Site Articles
Related Articles Around the Web
Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
True

Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

Keep Reading Show less
Images via Canva and Unsplash

If there's one thing that everyone can agree on, it's that being in a pandemic sucks.

However, we seem to be on different pages as to what sucks most about it. Many of us are struggling with being separated from our friends and loved ones for so long. Some of us have lost friends and family to the virus, while others are dealing with ongoing health effects of their own illness. Millions are struggling with job loss and financial stress due to businesses being closed. Parents are drowning, dealing with their kids' online schooling and lack of in-person social interactions on top of their own work logistics. Most of us hate wearing masks (even if we do so diligently), and the vast majority of us are just tired of having to think about and deal with everything the pandemic entails.

Much has been made of the mental health impact of the pandemic, which is a good thing. We need to have more open conversations about mental health in general, and with everything so upside down, it's more important now than ever. However, it feels like pandemic mental health conversations have been dominated by people who want to justify anti-lockdown arguments. "We can't let the cure be worse than the disease," people say. Kids' mental health is cited as a reason to open schools, the mental health challenges of financial despair as a reason to keep businesses open, and the mental health impact of social isolation as a reason to ditch social distancing measures.

It's not that those mental health challenges aren't real. They most definitely are. But when we focus exclusively on the mental health impact of lockdowns, we miss the fact that there are also significant mental health struggles on the other side of those arguments.

Keep Reading Show less
True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.

Keep Reading Show less

A vintage post-card collector on Flickr who goes by the username Post Man has kindly allowed us to share his wonderful collection of vintage postcards and erotica from the turn of the century. This album is full of exquisite photographs from around the world of a variety of people dressed in beautiful clothing in exotic settings. In an era well before the internet, these photographs would be one of the only ways you could could see how people in other countries looked and dressed.

Take a look at PostMan's gallery of over 90 vintage postcards on Flickr.

Keep Reading Show less
via Budweiser

Budweiser beer, and its low-calorie counterpart, Bud Light, have created some of the most memorable Super Bowl commercials of the past 37 years.

There were the Clydesdales playing football and the poor lost puppy who found its way home because of the helpful horses. Then there were the funny frogs who repeated the brand name, "Bud," "Weis," "Er."

We can't forget the "Wassup?!" ad that premiered in December 1999, spawning the most obnoxious catchphrase of the new millennium.

Keep Reading Show less