Heroes

Capitalism isn't working the way it should. Thankfully, we have options.

They say if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Well, it's broke.

Capitalism isn't working the way it should. Thankfully, we have options.

Money.

Sucks when you don't have enough, right?


Well, what if we could make it so more people could worry less about money?

I know I'd be all...

And, more importantly, what if we could do it without putting the health of the planet at greater risk?

We can.

They're calling it The Next System Project.

And they've assembled a phenomenal group of people to rally you along.

They say change doesn't happen overnight.

The truth is it's already happening. Maybe not in the places you'd hope — like Capitol Hill. (Side note: If you ask me, that's where too many good ideas go to die.)


OK, moving on...

Change could be happening right in your neighborhood.

In the video above, Angela Glover Blackwell refers to it as "the kernels of a systemic way to move forward."

She's talking about real-life, already-in-action ideas like...

A land trust is a non-profit that members of a community can establish to buy and develop land. These trusts can be used for commercial and retail purposes or, more commonly, for housing:

Ultimately, by separating the ownership of land and housing, this innovative approach prevents market factors from causing prices to rise significantly and, hence, guarantees that housing will remain affordable for future generations.

We all know fossil fuels won't last. And we should all know that burning them is making the world a less livable place. So why not invest more in renewable sources?

The main argument against it is money — oil and gas are "cheaper," which shouldn't actually matter. And at the end of the day, isn't money kinda pointless on an uninhabitable planet?


Farming isn't just for country folk. More people are coming around to urban agriculture as an alternative to the industrial food chain. Urban farmer and writer Rohit Kumar calls urban farming "the most important movement of our time" because of all the ways it benefits us beyond just the food:

  1. It boosts local economies.
  2. It reduces packaging waste, air pollution, and the use of chemical preservatives.
  3. It gets people more involved in local politics.
  4. It improves our attention on health and nutrition.
  5. It spurs interaction in communities.

Why should we give our hard-earned money to giant vampiric corporations? And why shouldn't more workers earn living wages and have a real stake in the businesses they're helping to run?

Cooperatively-owned businesses can make that possible while also generating billions of dollars in revenue, sparing the environment the punishment of conventional industry and pushing us to actually live our democratic ideals.

Those are just a few of the ideas we can elevate in the "next system." The whole idea is to expand on models that allow everyone to win. So what's not to like?

Let's not wait for the ship to sink, folks. We still have time to build a new one.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.

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President Biden/Twitter, Yamiche Alcindor/Twitter

In a year when the U.S. saw the largest protest movement in history in support of Black lives, when people of color have experienced disproportionate outcomes from the coronavirus pandemic, and when Black voters showed up in droves to flip two Senate seats in Georgia, Joe Biden entered the White House with a mandate to address the issue of racial equity in a meaningful way.

Not that it took any of those things to make racial issues in America real. White supremacy has undergirded laws, policies, and practices throughout our nation's history, and the ongoing impacts of that history are seen and felt widely by various racial and ethnic groups in America in various ways.

Today, President Biden spoke to these issues in straightforward language before signing four executive actions that aim to:

- promote fair housing policies to redress historical racial discrimination in federal housing and lending

- address criminal justice, starting by ending federal contracts with for-profit prisons

- strengthen nation-to-nation relationships with Native American tribes and Alaskan natives

- combat xenophobia against Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders, which has skyrocketed during the pandemic

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True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.

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via WFTV

Server Flavaine Carvalho was waiting on her last table of the night at Mrs. Potatohead's, a family restaurant in Orlando, Florida when she noticed something peculiar.

The parents of an 11-year-old boy were ordering food but told her that the child would be having his dinner later that night at home. She glanced at the boy who was wearing a hoodie, glasses, and a face mask and noticed a scratch between his eyes.

A closer look revealed a bruise on his temple.

So Carvalho walked away from the table and wrote a note that said, "Do you need help?" and showed it to the boy from an angle where his parents couldn't see.

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via TikTok

Menstrual taboos are as old as time and found across cultures. They've been used to separate women from men physically — menstrual huts are still a thing — and socially, by creating the perception that a natural bodily function is a sign of weakness.

Even in today's world women are deemed unfit for positions of power because some men actually believe they won't be able to handle stressful situations while mensurating.

"Menstruation is an opening for attack: a mark of shame, a sign of weakness, an argument to keep women out of positions of power,' Colin Schultz writes in Popular Science.

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