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Elder British gentleman celebrates the generation gap with the most wholesome TikToks ever

Brian Smith's calm-inducing TikToks appeal to young and old alike.

We live in a time when the oldest among us grew up without most of the things today's youth utilize in their daily lives. No computers, no televisions, no internet, no mobile phones (much less smartphones). It's a completely different world, and that generation gap has only gotten wider the more quickly technology has advanced.

But a generation gap doesn't have to be a bad thing. In fact, there's a great deal that people from different generations can learn from one another. And one gentleman from the grandparent generation is using TikTok to celebrate those differences with the most wholesome—and oddly soothing—videos.

Brian Smith was born in the 1940s and the world has changed incredibly since then. Smith acknowledges and marvels at what's changed, while also asking questions of younger people, while also lulling everyone onto a Zen state with his David Attenborough-like voice.


In one video, he shared how strange it was that he made a phone call on his watch, which used to be used to tell time, while making a video on his phone, which used to be used to make phone calls.

@brian..smith

Making a telephone call #phone #watch #time #tiktok

Then he followed up that video with a full-circle commentary on posting that video on TikTok, which is the sound that clocks and watches used to make. Delightful.

@brian..smith

Reply to @dylancostley #watch #phone #time #tiktok

Smith often responds to the comments on his videos, such as when someone called him "W human." Just watch. Seriously wholesome.

@brian..smith

Reply to @2_millimeter_defeater_ #generations #language #youth

Frequently, Smith will pose questions to his young audience, asking them about how they use technology.

@brian..smith

Reply to @fnatma Does text have a future? #communication #text #video

His sincere curiosity and desire to learn about the sociological differences between generations is inspiring.

@brian..smith

Do you use email? #asktiktok

@brian..smith

Talk to me about usernames #name #username #handles

Definitely David Attenborough vibes, with some Bob Ross and Fred Rogers thrown in for good measure.

The gentleman even has an epic model train setup, because of course he does.

@brian..smith

Model railway #model #railway #underground #tube

Smith shares snippets of history and also weighs in on current events. He has a special interest in Russia's invasion of Ukraine because he made a Russian friend online a while back and learned to speak Russian as a result.

He shared his concerns many times in the months leading up to the invasion.

@brian..smith

William Hague in today’s Times newspaper #politics

And he's spoken out for peace along with most of the world.

@brian..smith

Reply to @green4x Peace in Ukraine #мир #peace #ukraine #украина #україна

But the generational commentary Smith shares is the best. It's great to see someone of the older generation embracing technology, remaining curious and keeping an open mind. He loves to learn and it's so fun to see him with one foot in his own generation and one in, as he says, "Generation Zed."

@brian..smith

Reply to @bmcdeez #change #history #technology

Seriously, Brian Smith. Be more lovable.

@brian..smith

I do love TikTok #fun #barber #fleetstreet

Follow @brian..smith on TikTok.

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