A troll called this Fox News host's legs 'distracting.' Here's her mic-drop response.

Fox News meteorologist Janice Dean took a body-shaming internet troll to task for comments about her "distracting" legs.

"Please stop allowing Fox to dress you in those short skirts," read a Facebook comment aimed at Dean. "They are not flattering on you. Your [sic] an attractive lady, love the 80's hair, but your legs are distracting every time you walk on screen."

Dean responded in a separate post to her page:


"Fox doesn't dress me. I dress myself. I'm sorry if you don't like my legs. I'm grateful I have them to walk with. You're right. I don't look like the typical person on TV, and I'm proud to be a size 10. Imagine that! You can always turn the channel if you're offended by my huge legs. Hope you don't mind. I may share your post with everyone on my FB page. All the best, Janice."

Here's some of the fun compliments I get on my FACEBOOK page:Dear Janice please stop allowing fox to dress you in...

Posted by

Janice Dean on Monday, January 8, 2018

More than a decade ago, Dean was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, giving her a new appreciation for life and her legs.

Multiple sclerosis, or MS, is a disease in which the immune system attacks the body's central nervous system. It can affect the brain, the eyes' optic nerve, the spinal cord, and limbs, resulting in issues with balance, vision, and motor skills. Knowing that, it makes perfect sense that Dean would take such exception to this unsolicited criticism.

"I think people think that because we're on TV, nothing sticks to us," Dean has said. GIF from Fox News/YouTube.

Replying to Dean's Facebook post, her friend and MS nurse Jen Jarvis wrote a heartwarming note, reading, "I LOVE those strong legs. I LOVE that you stand talk, walk, run, squat, lunge, skip, and hop on those legs. You are blessed and a blessing to have STRONG legs!!! Wear skirts proudly and show your STRONG legs!!!!"

The whole exchange is a great reminder that you might not know exactly what someone else has been through.

That's why it's so important to choose kindness whenever possible.

MS or not, it's not cool to criticize someone for their appearance. Janice Dean is a real person, and she's not immune to hurtful words. "I think because we’re on TV, people think that we have armor on us and things don’t affect us," she said during a Fox broadcast not long after the tweet.

"These 47-year-old legs have gotten me through a lot and taken me a lot of amazing places," she later added, noting also:

"Now is the time to be strong. I don’t think we should call out everybody on social media, but you know what, we’ve been told to ignore sometimes. ... I want to be respectful and polite, but I also want to point attention to [the fact that] we’re not made of armor, these things do affect us, and I am proud of my big, strong legs!"

"I will continue to keep standing and kicking and dancing!" Dean said on Fox. GIF from Fox News/YouTube.

Watch Dean discuss her brush with an online bully in this video below.

True

When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

A young boy tried to grab the Pope's skull cap

A boy of about 10-years-old with a mental disability stole the show at Pope Francis' weekly general audience on Wednesday at the Vatican auditorium. In front of an audience of thousands the boy walked past security and onto the stage while priests delivered prayers and introductory speeches.

The boy, later identified as Paolo, Jr., greeted the pope by shaking his hand and when it was clear that he had no intention of leaving, the pontiff asked Monsignor Leonardo Sapienza, the head of protocol, to let the boy borrow his chair.

The boy's activity on the stage was clearly a breach of Vatican protocol but Pope Francis didn't seem to be bothered one bit. He looked at the child with a sense of joy and wasn't even disturbed when he repeatedly motioned that he wanted to remove his skull cap.

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