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Fox News meteorologist Janice Dean took a body-shaming internet troll to task for comments about her "distracting" legs.

"Please stop allowing Fox to dress you in those short skirts," read a Facebook comment aimed at Dean. "They are not flattering on you. Your [sic] an attractive lady, love the 80's hair, but your legs are distracting every time you walk on screen."

Dean responded in a separate post to her page:


"Fox doesn't dress me. I dress myself. I'm sorry if you don't like my legs. I'm grateful I have them to walk with. You're right. I don't look like the typical person on TV, and I'm proud to be a size 10. Imagine that! You can always turn the channel if you're offended by my huge legs. Hope you don't mind. I may share your post with everyone on my FB page. All the best, Janice."

Here's some of the fun compliments I get on my FACEBOOK page:Dear Janice please stop allowing fox to dress you in...

Posted by Janice Dean on Monday, January 8, 2018

More than a decade ago, Dean was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, giving her a new appreciation for life and her legs.

Multiple sclerosis, or MS, is a disease in which the immune system attacks the body's central nervous system. It can affect the brain, the eyes' optic nerve, the spinal cord, and limbs, resulting in issues with balance, vision, and motor skills. Knowing that, it makes perfect sense that Dean would take such exception to this unsolicited criticism.

[rebelmouse-image 19533657 dam="1" original_size="450x252" caption=""I think people think that because we're on TV, nothing sticks to us," Dean has said. GIF from Fox News/YouTube." expand=1]"I think people think that because we're on TV, nothing sticks to us," Dean has said. GIF from Fox News/YouTube.

Replying to Dean's Facebook post, her friend and MS nurse Jen Jarvis wrote a heartwarming note, reading, "I LOVE those strong legs. I LOVE that you stand talk, walk, run, squat, lunge, skip, and hop on those legs. You are blessed and a blessing to have STRONG legs!!! Wear skirts proudly and show your STRONG legs!!!!"

[facebook https://www.facebook.com/plugins/comment_embed.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FJaniceDean%2Fposts%2F10156007696870747%3Fcomment_id%3D10156007947560747&include_parent=false expand=1]

The whole exchange is a great reminder that you might not know exactly what someone else has been through.

That's why it's so important to choose kindness whenever possible.

MS or not, it's not cool to criticize someone for their appearance. Janice Dean is a real person, and she's not immune to hurtful words. "I think because we’re on TV, people think that we have armor on us and things don’t affect us," she said during a Fox broadcast not long after the tweet.

"These 47-year-old legs have gotten me through a lot and taken me a lot of amazing places," she later added, noting also:

"Now is the time to be strong. I don’t think we should call out everybody on social media, but you know what, we’ve been told to ignore sometimes. ... I want to be respectful and polite, but I also want to point attention to [the fact that] we’re not made of armor, these things do affect us, and I am proud of my big, strong legs!"

[rebelmouse-image 19533659 dam="1" original_size="450x265" caption=""I will continue to keep standing and kicking and dancing!" Dean said on Fox. GIF from Fox News/YouTube." expand=1]"I will continue to keep standing and kicking and dancing!" Dean said on Fox. GIF from Fox News/YouTube.

Watch Dean discuss her brush with an online bully in this video below.

Photo courtesy of Girls at Work

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via Lewis Speaks Sr. / Facebook

This article originally appeared on 02.25.21


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As if the social pressure wasn't enough, a child that age has to deal with the intensely awkward psychological and biological changes of puberty at the same time.

Jason Smith, the principal of Stonybrook Intermediate and Middle School in Warren Township, Indiana, had a young student sent to his office recently, and his ability to understand his feelings made all the difference.

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All images provided by Adewole Adamson

It begins with more inclusive conversations at a patient level

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Adewole Adamson, MD, of the University of Texas, Austin, aims to create more equity in health care by gathering data from more diverse populations by using artificial intelligence (AI), a type of machine learning. Dr. Adamson’s work is funded by the American Cancer Society (ACS), an organization committed to advancing health equity through research priorities, programs and services for groups who have been marginalized.

Melanoma became a particular focus for Dr. Adamson after meeting Avery Smith, who lost his wife—a Black woman—to the deadly disease.

melanoma,  melanoma for dark skin Avery Smith (left) and Adamson (sidenote)

This personal encounter, coupled with multiple conversations with Black dermatology patients, drove Dr. Adamson to a concerning discovery: as advanced as AI is at detecting possible skin cancers, it is heavily biased.

To understand this bias, it helps to first know how AI works in the early detection of skin cancer, which Dr. Adamson explains in his paper for the New England Journal of Medicine (paywall). The process uses computers that rely on sets of accumulated data to learn what healthy or unhealthy skin looks like and then create an algorithm to predict diagnoses based on those data sets.

This process, known as supervised learning, could lead to huge benefits in preventive care.

After all, early detection is key to better outcomes. The problem is that the data sets don’t include enough information about darker skin tones. As Adamson put it, “everything is viewed through a ‘white lens.’”

“If you don’t teach the algorithm with a diverse set of images, then that algorithm won’t work out in the public that is diverse,” writes Adamson in a study he co-wrote with Smith (according to a story in The Atlantic). “So there’s risk, then, for people with skin of color to fall through the cracks.”

Tragically, Smith’s wife was diagnosed with melanoma too late and paid the ultimate price for it. And she was not an anomaly—though the disease is more common for White patients, Black cancer patients are far more likely to be diagnosed at later stages, causing a notable disparity in survival rates between non-Hispanics whites (90%) and non-Hispanic blacks (66%).

As a computer scientist, Smith suspected this racial bias and reached out to Adamson, hoping a Black dermatologist would have more diverse data sets. Though Adamson didn’t have what Smith was initially looking for, this realization ignited a personal mission to investigate and reduce disparities.

Now, Adamson uses the knowledge gained through his years of research to help advance the fight for health equity. To him, that means not only gaining a wider array of data sets, but also having more conversations with patients to understand how socioeconomic status impacts the level and efficiency of care.

“At the end of the day, what matters most is how we help patients at the patient level,” Adamson told Upworthy. “And how can you do that without knowing exactly what barriers they face?”

american cancer society, skin cacner treatment"What matters most is how we help patients at the patient level."https://www.kellydavidsonstudio.com/

The American Cancer Society believes everyone deserves a fair and just opportunity to prevent, find, treat, and survive cancer—regardless of how much money they make, the color of their skin, their sexual orientation, gender identity, their disability status, or where they live. Inclusive tools and resources on the Health Equity section of their website can be found here. For more information about skin cancer, visit cancer.org/skincancer.

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Pop Culture

Artist uses AI to create ultra realistic portraits of celebrities who left us too soon

What would certain icons look like if nothing had happened to them?

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Some icons have truly left this world too early. It’s a tragedy when anyone doesn’t make it to see old age, but when it happens to a well-known public figure, it’s like a bit of their art and legacy dies with them. What might Freddie Mercury have created if he were granted the gift of long life? Bruce Lee? Princess Diana?

Their futures might be mere musings of our imagination, but thanks to a lot of creativity (and a little tech) we can now get a glimpse into what these celebrities might have looked like when they were older.

Alper Yesiltas, an Istanbul-based lawyer and photographer, created a photography series titled “As If Nothing Happened,” which features eerily realistic portraits of long gone celebrities in their golden years. To make the images as real looking as possible, Yesiltas incorporated various photo editing programs such as Adobe Lightroom and VSCO, as well as the AI photo-enhancing software Remini.

“The hardest part of the creative process for me is making the image feel ‘real’ to me,” Yesiltas wrote about his passion project. “The moment I like the most is when I think the image in front of me looks as if it was taken by a photographer.”

Yesiltas’ meticulousness paid off, because the results are uncanny.

Along with each photo, Yesiltas writes a bittersweet message “wishing” how things might have gone differently … as if nothing happened.
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