A Texas congresswoman had devastating words for her colleagues who support Trumpcare.

During the live debate over the American Health Care Act, Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee delivered a furious address in an attempt to make the bill's supporters face the real human damage they might be about to cause.

Image via C-SPAN.

Standing on the House floor next to an image of a woman lying ill in a hospital bed, Jackson Lee, a breast cancer survivor, tore into the House Republican health plan, which could gut coverage for Americans with pre-existing conditions, like Jackson Lee, and leave millions uninsured.


"This heartless and callous bill, with 24 million plus people being thrown off of their health care and reverse Robin Hood of stealing from the poor or the seniors laying in their bed where you're doing an age tax that is five times more than any other young person has to pay, that is disgraceful," Jackson Lee admonished in her fiery address.

"I don't want the poor to sleep under bridges, to beg in the streets, to steal bread from the market because they don't have any health insurance," she continued.

If Jackson Lee's words weren't electrifying enough, the following speaker, Rep. Doug Collins, waved off her passionate condemnation with a sexist joke.

"If I had to defend Obamacare, I'd go into hysterics too," the Georgia congressman said immediately after Jackson Lee finished speaking.  

The responses were fast and furious.

There's nothing "hysterical" about worrying that the AHCA will raise premiums for people with chronic or life-threatening illnesses by thousands — or in some cases, tens of thousands — of dollars.

That was the conclusion of the Center for American Progress, which estimates that a 40-year-old living with asthma could see a surcharge of over $4,000 under the plan, while that same 40-year-old battling cancer could be upcharged over $140,000.

One representative alone can't stop the bill — but millions of Americans might be able to.

Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images.

Whether it passes the House or not, the debate over the AHCA is far from over. For those who don't want to see it become law, call your elected officials right now and tell them how you feel.

For those determined to see the bill pass, Jackson Lee had no advice — only ominous parting words.

"God have mercy on your souls."

Update 5/4/17: The bill passed the House. Thankfully, it still has to make it through the Senate if it's going to become law. If you don't want to see that happen, now is a great time to get on the phone with your senator.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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