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7 times Stephen Colbert didn't just push the envelope — he crushed it.

Here are just a few of many moments from "The Colbert Report" that remind me of how much I already miss the show.

7 times Stephen Colbert didn't just push the envelope — he crushed it.

1. When he called the President of the United States of America a "skinny bitch."

In defense of corporations, of course.


Watch the video.

2. When he was somewhere between 0 and 100 percent impressed by George Bush.

George P. Bush, that is — son of Jeb, nephew of George W., and grandson of George H.W.

Watch the video.

3. When he politely let two famous musicians know their song kinda really, really sucks.

Nice try, fellas. You live and you learn, right?


Watch the video.

4. When he warned us that a big gay storm was coming.

With a hilariously awkward/sexy political ad.

5. When he learned how to make $800,000 disappear.

Like a true political pro.

6. When he tried to kill his uncle with a Christmas card.

Because taxes.

7. When he DESTROYED at the 2006 White House Correspondents' Dinner.

And fulfilled his dream of meeting George W. Bush. You'll love every minute of this.

"The Colbert Report" brought truthiness and laughter to millions of people for nine years.

While the show is no more, the legend of his character lives on through his loyal fandom (Colbert Nation) and the magic of the Internet.

In 2015, Colbert will become host of "The Late Show," taking the desk David Letterman has captained since 1993.

His audience will be much larger (yay for basic cable!), so here's to hoping he brings some of that truthiness to his new stage. This country really needs it.

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


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I got married and started working in my early 20s, and for more than two decades I always had employer-provided health insurance. When the Affordable Care Act (ACA, aka "Obamacare")was passed, I didn't give it a whole lot of thought. I was glad it helped others, but I just assumed my husband or I would always be employed and wouldn't need it.

Then, last summer, we found ourselves in an unexpected scenario. I was working as a freelance writer with regular contract work and my husband left his job to manage our short-term rentals and do part-time contracting work. We both had incomes, but for the first time, no employer-provided insurance. His previous employer offered COBRA coverage, of course, but it was crazy expensive. It made far more sense to go straight to the ACA Marketplace, since that's what we'd have done once COBRA ran out anyway.

The process of getting our ACA healthcare plan set up was a nightmare, but I'm so very thankful for it.

Let me start by saying I live in a state that is friendly to the ACA and that adopted and implemented the Medicaid expansion. I am also a college-educated and a native English speaker with plenty of adult paperwork experience. But the process of getting set up on my state's marketplace was the most confusing, frustrating experience I've ever had signing up for anything, ever.

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn’t have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women’s rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

Then there are those of us in the messy middle. Those who believe that life begins at conception, that abortion isn’t something we’d choose—and we’d hope others wouldn’t choose—under most circumstances, yet who choose to vote to keep abortion legal.

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via Lorie Shaull / Flickr

The epidemic of violence against Indigenous women in America is one of the country's most disturbing trends. A major reason it persists is because it's rarely discussed outside of the native community.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, murder is the third-leading cause of death among American Indian and Alaska Native women under age 19.

Women who live on some reservations face rates of violence that are as much as ten times higher than the national average.

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