13 rare photos from a 1942 New Year's party show what's changed — and what hasn't.

73 years ago, the Di Costanzo family hosted an epic New Year's Eve throw down at their restaurant on Mulberry Street in New York City.

Photo by Marjorie Collins/Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information.


The venue? Marconi's restaurant, in Little Italy, which the Di Costanzo family owned and operated.

There was drinking, eating, dancing, celebrating, ... and more drinking.

These incredible images — featured in Yale University's incredible archive of (largely rarely-seen) photos taken by New Deal photographers in the '30s and '40s — are a fascinating window into how New Year's was celebrated over seven decades ago, at least by one New York family.

The drink selection might have been a bit more limited, and rogue castanet dancers were probably a little more likely to show up back then, but otherwise — if the photos are to be believed — not much has changed.

1. Mrs. Di Costanzo helps her chef cut bread for the party.

Photo by Marjorie Collins/Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information.

Anyone else suddenly hungry?

2. Chef's got something going in the frying pan too...

Photo by Marjorie Collins/Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information.

Is it lunchtime? Dinnertime? My goodness, just please say it's time to eat.

3. ...while simultaneously assembling two giant sausage-and-peppers subs.

Photo by Marjorie Collins/Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information.

This guy is my hero.

4. Mr. and Mrs. Di Costanzo toast the new year at the bar.

Photo by Marjorie Collins/Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information.

Salute!

5. While the couple toast, the man sitting next to them is entranced by ... something off camera.

Photo by Marjorie Collins/Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information.

"Hold on a sec. This play is really important for my fantasy team."

6. Even though there are a few customers in the restaurant, the family gathers around a big table in the back to celebrate.

Photo by Marjorie Collins/Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information.

Not with the family at the table is the Di Costanzo's son. Like many young men at the time — and many American men and women now — he was serving in the military and away from family, possibly overseas. There's a picture of him on the wall to the left, under the small American flag.

7. Another toast, this time with the whole gang!

Photo by Marjorie Collins/Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information.

Once more, with feeling!

8. At the bar, the Di Costanzo daughters (presumably) discuss serious family matters.

Photo by Marjorie Collins/Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information.

"Can you believe cousin Dot is 20 years old and still not married."
"Cousin Dot doesn't have to conform to the rigid patriarchal expectations society imposes on young women!"
"Yes she does. It's the '40s."
"Oh, good point."


9. But ultimately, even they just want to drink.

Photo by Marjorie Collins/Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information.

In all of recorded history, there was never a family more serious about its toasting.

10. Oh, and there was dancing.

Photo by Marjorie Collins/Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information.

This woman came in to grab some food and just decided to start dancing. She's absolutely crushing it with those castanets.

11. And more dancing!

Photo by Marjorie Collins/Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information.

The kid up front is clearly feeling some feelings.

12. Mama looks pleased at the end of the night

Photo by Marjorie Collins/Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information.

She just threw a hell of a party and she clearly knows it. She's earned every sip of that Chianti.

13. The next morning, children blow horns on top of a giant dirt pile on nearby Bleecker Street to ring in the new year.

Photo by Marjorie Collins/Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information.

Can we please get this in Times Square this year? I'm looking at you, CNN.

Happy 2016/1943!

Photo by Marjorie Collins/Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information.

If anyone has a line on where I can get one of those seven-decade-old hoagies, please let me know.

Seriously. Please.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

When the COVID-19 pandemic socially distanced the world and pushed off the 2020 Olympics, we knew the games weren't going to be the same. The fact that they're even happening this year is a miracle, but without spectators and the usual hustle and bustle surrounding the events, it definitely feels different.

But it's not just the games themselves that have changed. The coverage of the Olympics has changed as well, including the unexpected addition of un-expert, uncensored commentary from comedian Kevin Hart and rapper Snoop Dogg on NBC's Peacock.

In the topsy-turvy world we're currently living in, it's both a refreshing and hilarious addition to the Olympic lineup.

Just watch this clip of them narrating an equestrian event. (Language warning if you've got kiddos nearby. The first video is bleeped, but the others aren't.)

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