This men's talk show got uncomfortably candid about #MeToo. It's a must-watch.

'We need to understand that having good intentions is not enough.'

Warning: The video and article below discusses sexual violence and rape.

There's a new men's talk show called "Man Enough" that just devoted an entire gut-wrenching episode to the #MeToo movement and sexual assault.

The guys who participated in the episode's roundtable — Justin Baldoni, Matt McGorry, Lewis Howes, Jamey Heath, Tony Porter, and Scooter Braun — opened up about their own shortcomings and experiences with sexual abuse and how, exactly, men can be part of the solution.

It's worth a watch, for men especially. Here's the full episode (story continues below):





Man Enough Episode 4 - #MeToo

How can we learn from #MeToo to shape the next generation of men?Join the conversation with Justin Baldoni, Matt McGorry, Jamey Heath, Lewis Howes, Scooter Braun, Tony Porter, Karen Alston, Alma Gonzalez and Yazmin Monet Watkins.Stay tuned after the episode for a special message from our partner, Child Safety Pledge.#ManEnough #Harrys #ChildSafetyPledge

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Terry Crews' courage and advocacy have made him an important ally in the #MeToo era.

The "Brooklyn 99" star has been an outspoken advocate, opening up about his own experience with sexual assault.

"My name is Terry Crews," he said at the beginning of his testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee. "I am an actor, author, former athlete, advocate, and a survivor of a sexual assault."

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At the forefront of changing how our world views masculinity are those who create imagery of it.

Filmmakers, television writers, photographers, and other multimedia professionals are beginning to shift how they explore and present masculinity in their work, and companies are following. One of the companies using their brand to help shift societal norms is Getty Images.

2. A relaxed man is probably a happy man. Photo by Alex Grabchilev/Evgeniya Bakanova/Getty Images.

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"If you want to be 'man enough,' you don't cry. You can't show pain. You can't show upset."

These are the messages teen boys are getting from our society, as revealed in an interview with NBC's Stephanie Ruhle. She sat down with five teens aged 13 to 17 to talk about what it means to grow up as boys and men in the U.S.

The interview, aired on March 25, was partially inspired by a New York Times op-ed by actor Michael Ian Black published in February. In "The Boys Are Not All Right," Black describes our society’s culture of masculinity and how it’s affecting boys:

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