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What is feminism, really? This comic sums it up well.

'Today's feminism ... aims to include all women, keeping in mind that women face different problems based on their race.'

What is feminism, really? This comic sums it up well.

I didn't truly understand what being a feminist meant until I started feeling the unfair effects of a male-dominated society myself.

I noticed my male counterparts earning more money than me but doing the same job. I was constantly asked when I was going to settle down as I neared my 30s, as if I were expected to abandon my career goals and strive to attain a conventional family life instead.

That was when I decided that I was a feminist.


Maybe the word "feminism" looks different to me in my life than it does to you in your life or to the feminist next door. But at the end of the day, I believe that feminism is about wanting one thing: for women to have the same opportunities as men in all aspects of life.

A 31-year-old graphic designer named Talhí Briones created a delightfully enlightening comic that explains why being a feminist doesn't have to look the same for every woman or man.

Briones published the illustrations on International Women's Day (celebrated on March 8) for her family, friends, and Facebook fans as a powerful response to Quebec minister Lise Thériault publicly rejecting the feminist label. The original comic was in French but has since been translated into Chinese, Russian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Talhí explains why feminism benefits and affects us all:

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

This comic is a lovely visual reminder of why we shouldn't distance ourselves from the word "feminism."

Feminism is a beautiful and necessary movement that is slowly but surely making a difference for the better.

Yes, there's still a long way to go. But consider all the progress that's already been made: The U.S. government has taken new steps to lessen the gender wage gap, the U.S. Department of Labor has recognized the benefits of offering paternity leave, and — hello! — America has a female candidate running for president.

So we're on the right track. But more importantly: We need to keep going.

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Frito-Lay

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This school year is unlike any other. Frito-Lay knew the critical need to ensure children have enough food and resources to succeed. The company quickly pivoted to expand its partnership with Feed the Children, a leading nonprofit focused on alleviating childhood hunger, to create the "Building the Future Together" program to provide shelf-stable food to supplement more than a quarter-million meals and distribute 500,000 pantry staples, school supplies, snacks, books, hand sanitizer, and personal care items to schools in underserved communities.

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