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What is feminism, really? This comic sums it up well.

'Today's feminism ... aims to include all women, keeping in mind that women face different problems based on their race.'

What is feminism, really? This comic sums it up well.

I didn't truly understand what being a feminist meant until I started feeling the unfair effects of a male-dominated society myself.

I noticed my male counterparts earning more money than me but doing the same job. I was constantly asked when I was going to settle down as I neared my 30s, as if I were expected to abandon my career goals and strive to attain a conventional family life instead.

That was when I decided that I was a feminist.


Maybe the word "feminism" looks different to me in my life than it does to you in your life or to the feminist next door. But at the end of the day, I believe that feminism is about wanting one thing: for women to have the same opportunities as men in all aspects of life.

A 31-year-old graphic designer named Talhí Briones created a delightfully enlightening comic that explains why being a feminist doesn't have to look the same for every woman or man.

Briones published the illustrations on International Women's Day (celebrated on March 8) for her family, friends, and Facebook fans as a powerful response to Quebec minister Lise Thériault publicly rejecting the feminist label. The original comic was in French but has since been translated into Chinese, Russian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Talhí explains why feminism benefits and affects us all:

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

This comic is a lovely visual reminder of why we shouldn't distance ourselves from the word "feminism."

Feminism is a beautiful and necessary movement that is slowly but surely making a difference for the better.

Yes, there's still a long way to go. But consider all the progress that's already been made: The U.S. government has taken new steps to lessen the gender wage gap, the U.S. Department of Labor has recognized the benefits of offering paternity leave, and — hello! — America has a female candidate running for president.

So we're on the right track. But more importantly: We need to keep going.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.