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What is feminism, really? This comic sums it up well.

'Today's feminism ... aims to include all women, keeping in mind that women face different problems based on their race.'

I didn't truly understand what being a feminist meant until I started feeling the unfair effects of a male-dominated society myself.

I noticed my male counterparts earning more money than me but doing the same job. I was constantly asked when I was going to settle down as I neared my 30s, as if I were expected to abandon my career goals and strive to attain a conventional family life instead.

That was when I decided that I was a feminist.


Maybe the word "feminism" looks different to me in my life than it does to you in your life or to the feminist next door. But at the end of the day, I believe that feminism is about wanting one thing: for women to have the same opportunities as men in all aspects of life.

A 31-year-old graphic designer named Talhí Briones created a delightfully enlightening comic that explains why being a feminist doesn't have to look the same for every woman or man.

Briones published the illustrations on International Women's Day (celebrated on March 8) for her family, friends, and Facebook fans as a powerful response to Quebec minister Lise Thériault publicly rejecting the feminist label. The original comic was in French but has since been translated into Chinese, Russian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Talhí explains why feminism benefits and affects us all:

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

This comic is a lovely visual reminder of why we shouldn't distance ourselves from the word "feminism."

Feminism is a beautiful and necessary movement that is slowly but surely making a difference for the better.

Yes, there's still a long way to go. But consider all the progress that's already been made: The U.S. government has taken new steps to lessen the gender wage gap, the U.S. Department of Labor has recognized the benefits of offering paternity leave, and — hello! — America has a female candidate running for president.

So we're on the right track. But more importantly: We need to keep going.

A viral video from a Little League game has people celebrating good sportsmanship.

Youth sports have gotten more intensely competitive, to the point where overeager parents and coaches have to regularly be reminded to take it down a notch. So when humanity takes precedence over team rivalries, it's extra heartwarming.

And considering how many "kids these days" laments we see coming from older generations, it's also heartening to see kids showing excellent character qualities when no one directly asked them to.

A viral video from a Little League baseball game is giving us a nice dose of both—good sportsmanship and basic human kindness from two players from opposing teams.

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Heroes

'I put my arms around him': Man risks his life saving a stranger during suicide attempt on bridge

"I told him whatever it was, whatever was going on in his life, it was going to be OK."

Rochester, New York.

Suicide is an emotionally fraught and complex topic to discuss. But one overlooked part of the issue that provides some hope is that even though suicidal crises are predominantly caused by chronic issues, they are usually short-lived.

An article in the journal Crisis, cited in a Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health news piece, states that the acute period of heightened risk for suicidal behavior is often only hours or minutes long. Around 87% of people deliberated for less than a day. Another article in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry found that of people taken to the hospital after a suicide attempt, 48% considered the idea for fewer than 10 minutes.

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Pop Culture

Guy makes a tweet about what you should have 'by age 30.' People's responses were hilarious.

"By the age of 30 you should have anxiety, and an emotional support pet that also has anxiety."

Photo by NIPYATA! on Unsplash

This is 30.

When Steve Adcock, an entrepreneur and “fitness buff” posted this to his Twitter:

“By age 30, you should have a group of friends that talk business, money, and fitness, not politics and pop culture.”

… people had thoughts.



His post might have been intended as more of an encouragement to surround yourself with people who challenge your current mindset, considering the tweet continued with “one of the biggest mistakes I've ever made was making friends with like-minded folks who talked about the same [stuff] over and over. I agreed with 99% of it. Your comfort zone will kill your progress.”

But still, overall the tweet left an unsavory taste in people’s mouths—primarily because it implied that money was somehow a better conversation topic than what people are usually genuinely passionate about. Why not talk about your favorite television show with friends if it lights you up inside?


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