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What is feminism, really? This comic sums it up well.

'Today's feminism ... aims to include all women, keeping in mind that women face different problems based on their race.'

What is feminism, really? This comic sums it up well.

I didn't truly understand what being a feminist meant until I started feeling the unfair effects of a male-dominated society myself.

I noticed my male counterparts earning more money than me but doing the same job. I was constantly asked when I was going to settle down as I neared my 30s, as if I were expected to abandon my career goals and strive to attain a conventional family life instead.

That was when I decided that I was a feminist.


Maybe the word "feminism" looks different to me in my life than it does to you in your life or to the feminist next door. But at the end of the day, I believe that feminism is about wanting one thing: for women to have the same opportunities as men in all aspects of life.

A 31-year-old graphic designer named Talhí Briones created a delightfully enlightening comic that explains why being a feminist doesn't have to look the same for every woman or man.

Briones published the illustrations on International Women's Day (celebrated on March 8) for her family, friends, and Facebook fans as a powerful response to Quebec minister Lise Thériault publicly rejecting the feminist label. The original comic was in French but has since been translated into Chinese, Russian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Talhí explains why feminism benefits and affects us all:

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

Illustration by Talhí Briones, used with permission.

This comic is a lovely visual reminder of why we shouldn't distance ourselves from the word "feminism."

Feminism is a beautiful and necessary movement that is slowly but surely making a difference for the better.

Yes, there's still a long way to go. But consider all the progress that's already been made: The U.S. government has taken new steps to lessen the gender wage gap, the U.S. Department of Labor has recognized the benefits of offering paternity leave, and — hello! — America has a female candidate running for president.

So we're on the right track. But more importantly: We need to keep going.

Photo courtesy of Claudia Romo Edelman
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When the novel coronavirus hit the United States, life as we knew it quickly changed. As many people holed up in their homes, some essential workers had to make the impossible choice of going to work or quitting their jobs— a choice they continue to make each day.

Because over 80 percent of working Hispanic adults provide essential services for the U.S. economy, the Hispanic community is disproportionately affected. Hispanic families are also much more likely to live in multigenerational households, carrying the extra risk of infecting the most vulnerable. In fact, Hispanics are 20 times more likely than other patients to test positive for COVID-19.

Claudia Romo Edelman saw a community in desperate need of guidance and support. And she created Hispanic Star, a non-profit designed to help Hispanic people in the U.S. pull together as a proud, unified group and overcome barriers — the most pressing of which is the effects of the pandemic.

Because the Hispanic community is so diverse, unification is, and was, an enormous challenge.

Photo credit: Hispanic Star

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via Taber Andrew Bain / Flickr

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Lawmakers in the state would like to shorten the name because the term "plantations" has a historical connection to slavery in the United States.

This isn't the first time the state has attempted to remove "plantations" from its name. Rhode Island attempted the change ten years ago and 78% of voters opposed the idea.

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Photo courtesy of Claudia Romo Edelman
True

When the novel coronavirus hit the United States, life as we knew it quickly changed. As many people holed up in their homes, some essential workers had to make the impossible choice of going to work or quitting their jobs— a choice they continue to make each day.

Because over 80 percent of working Hispanic adults provide essential services for the U.S. economy, the Hispanic community is disproportionately affected. Hispanic families are also much more likely to live in multigenerational households, carrying the extra risk of infecting the most vulnerable. In fact, Hispanics are 20 times more likely than other patients to test positive for COVID-19.

Claudia Romo Edelman saw a community in desperate need of guidance and support. And she created Hispanic Star, a non-profit designed to help Hispanic people in the U.S. pull together as a proud, unified group and overcome barriers — the most pressing of which is the effects of the pandemic.

Because the Hispanic community is so diverse, unification is, and was, an enormous challenge.

Photo credit: Hispanic Star

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Sure, adults can make excuses for him saying he's an "imperfect messenger" or that they "didn't vote for him to be reverend," but these are all just ways to rationalize voting for a man with zero character. What a message to send to children: Act awful and you'll be handsomely rewarded.

But what if you took away the "Trump" name and examined the character traits of him as an ordinary person? More specifically, what if your daughter came to you and said this was the kind of person she was planning to date? Well, one MAGA family found out and the results are funny, insightful and quite revealing about how we somehow hold our leaders to different and lower standards than we expect from ourselves in our day to day lives.

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