He's putting his weight behind an issue that's vital to election outcomes but doesn't often get a lot of attention.

A recently released three-minute political video starred a very familiar political face: Barack Obama. The video was created by the National Democratic Redistricting Committee (NDRC), a group run by former Attorney General Eric Holder, whose mission is to prevent partisan gerrymandering.

Gerrymandering, simply put, is the practice of a state government redrawing its congressional district maps to unfairly favor one party in elections. For example, Texas Republicans have been charged with doing just that, likely preventing minorities and Democrats from winning more elections.

Keep Reading Show less
More

In the first part of 2018, Alabama politics were getting a monumental shakeup — courtesy of black women.

At least 70 black women candidates launched electoral campaigns across Alabama for local, state, and national offices in 2018. It's a historic number in Alabama state politics.

Teri Sewell became the first black woman to represent Alabama in Congress in 2011. Now she supports other black woman candidates. Photo by Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images.

Keep Reading Show less
More

A bunch of badass women brunched together in L.A. on Feb. 27, hungry for change in Washington come November.

Over poached eggs and avocado toast, women like former U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer, former Teen Vogue Editor-in-Chief Elaine Welteroth, and comedian Chelsea Handler zeroed in on a shared goal for 2018: Get more progressive women from diverse backgrounds elected to public office.

Amber Tamblyn, Constance Wu, Elaine Welteroth, Padma Lakshmi, Barbara Boxer, and Chelsea Handler. Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images.

Keep Reading Show less
More

Vice President-elect Mike Pence wanted to be in the room where it happens. So he went to see "Hamilton" on Nov. 18, 2016.

But when Pence arrived at the Richard Rodgers Theatre in New York City to see the critically acclaimed hip-hop musical about the life of Alexander Hamilton, he was met with a chorus of boos and jeers (and, for the record, a few scattered claps).

Matthew Anderson, a theater buff visiting New York from Minneapolis said the display before the show was unlike anything he'd seen.

Pence was brought to his seat shortly before the show began.

Keep Reading Show less
Most Shared